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Female Labour Market Participation: Differences Between Primary and Tied Movers

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  • Ahn T. Le

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

Abstract

This paper examines the labour market participation choices of female migrants who were the primary decision makers in their family’s migration decision and of females who were secondary or tied movers. The results reveal that the difference in labour force participation between primary and tied movers is due mainly to their different characteristics. While pecuniary rewards are important to the primary movers’ decision to enter the labour market, they do not significantly contribute to the difference in labour force participation between primary and tied movers.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahn T. Le, 2003. "Female Labour Market Participation: Differences Between Primary and Tied Movers," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 03-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:03-17
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    References listed on IDEAS

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