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The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia

Author

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  • Deborah Cobb‐Clark

Abstract

This article sets out the advantages and limitations of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia data for undertaking immigration research.

Suggested Citation

  • Deborah Cobb‐Clark, 2001. "The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(4), pages 467-477, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:34:y:2001:i:4:p:467-477
    DOI: 10.1111/1467-8462.00216
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. P.N. (Raja) Junankar & Stéphane Mahuteau, 2005. "Do Migrants Get Good Jobs? New Migrant Settlement in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 81(s1), pages 34-46, August.
    2. Ahn T. Le, 2003. "Female Labour Market Participation: Differences Between Primary and Tied Movers," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 03-17, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    3. Green, Colin & Kler, Parvinder & Leeves, Gareth, 2007. "Immigrant overeducation: Evidence from recent arrivals to Australia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 420-432, August.
    4. Hannah E Carter & Deborah J Schofield & Rupendra Shrestha, 2016. "The Productivity Costs of Premature Mortality Due to Cancer in Australia: Evidence from a Microsimulation Model," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(12), pages 1-13, December.
    5. Barry Chiswick & Yew Lee & Paul Miller, 2005. "Family matters: the role of the family in immigrants' destination language acquisition," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 631-647, November.
    6. Tani, Massimiliano, 2017. "Local signals and the returns to foreign education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 174-190.
    7. Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "Learning from Other Economies: The Unique Institutional and Policy Experiments Down Under," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(257), pages 195-206, June.
    8. Hannah E Carter & Deborah J Schofield & Rupendra Shrestha, 2014. "Editorial Volume 7(3)," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 7(3), pages 33-52.
    9. Mosfequs Salehin & Robert Breunig, 2012. "The immigrant wage gap and assimilation in Australia: the impact of unobserved heterogeneity," CEPR Discussion Papers 661, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    10. T Kifle & P Kler & CM Fleming, 2018. "Australian immigrantsâ labour market success: Does occupation matter?," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201805, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.

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