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Changing Food Safety Risk Perceptions: The Influence of Message Framings & Media Food Safety Information

Author

Listed:
  • Britwum, Kofi
  • Yiannaka, Amalia

Abstract

Human cases of E. coli O157:H7 infections linked to the consumption of contaminated beef products consistently receive public attention due to their far-reaching health and economic implications. As consumers’ risk attitudes and perceptions remain pivotal to beef food safety initiatives, the study seeks to investigate the role of message framings and media food safety information on consumers’ valuation of their risk of an E. coli food infection, and attitudes towards food safety technologies. Using a nationally representative sample of 1,842 residents across the US, respondents were randomly assigned into six information groups. Findings reveal that message framings, particularly loss-framed messages influence consumers’ perceived risks, and attitudes towards food safety interventions. Respondents who received the media story about the plight of a consumer who suffered an E. coli infection showed more concern about the risk of an infection, while those who received loss-framed information were in general more accepting of food safety interventions such as vaccines and direct fed microbials. These findings could help the beef industry and policy makers develop effective food safety communication strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Britwum, Kofi & Yiannaka, Amalia, 2016. "Changing Food Safety Risk Perceptions: The Influence of Message Framings & Media Food Safety Information," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230106, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea16:230106
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/230106/files/Changing%20Food%20Safety%20Risk%20Perceptions%20-%20Influence%20of%20message%20framings.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robin Dillaway & Kent D. Messer & John C. Bernard & Harry M. Kaiser, 2011. "Do Consumer Responses to Media Food Safety Information Last?," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(3), pages 363-383.
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    6. Nicholas C. Barberis, 2013. "Thirty Years of Prospect Theory in Economics: A Review and Assessment," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 173-196, Winter.
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