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Do Consumer Responses to Media Food Safety Information Last?


  • Robin Dillaway
  • Kent D. Messer
  • John C. Bernard
  • Harry M. Kaiser


Using experimental methods with adult subjects from the mid-Atlantic region of the United States, this research examines both the short- and longer-term impacts of media information on consumer purchasing behavior. Subjects in the treatment group were given food safety information about poultry from a popular consumer magazine. Willingness to pay (WTP) estimates were then elicited for two types of chicken breasts: (1) a leading-brand that was identified in the information treatment as having a high incidence of Campylobacter and Salmonella bacteria; and (2) a lesser known brand, which was reported as being relatively free of harmful bacteria. Results indicated that both negative and positive food safety information significantly impacted consumers' WTP for safer chicken compared to the reportedly less-safe leading-brand chicken. These changes in behavior persisted throughout the seven-week study period.

Suggested Citation

  • Robin Dillaway & Kent D. Messer & John C. Bernard & Harry M. Kaiser, 2011. "Do Consumer Responses to Media Food Safety Information Last?," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(3), pages 363-383.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:apecpp:v:33:y:2011:i:3:p:363-383.

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    Cited by:

    1. Yadavalli, Anita & Jones, Keithly, 2014. "Does media influence consumer demand? The case of lean finely textured beef in the United States," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 219-227.
    2. Ellis, Addison & Kropp, Jaclyn D. & Norton, Michael T., 2013. "Estimating the Indirect Economic Costs to Shrimp Consumers from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Gulf Coast Oil Spill," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 142576, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Jura Liaukonyte & Nadia A. Streletskaya & Harry M. Kaiser, 2015. "The Long-Term Impact of Positive and Negative Information on Food Demand," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 63(4), pages 539-562, December.
    4. Britwum, Kofi & Yiannaka, Amalia, 2016. "Consumer Willingness to Pay for Food Safety Interventions: The Role of Message Framing and Involvement," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235884, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Britwum, Kofi & Yiannaka, Amalia, 2016. "Changing Food Safety Risk Perceptions: The Influence of Message Framings & Media Food Safety Information," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230106, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Peake, Whitney O. & Detre, Joshua D. & Carlson, Clinton C., 2014. "One bad apple spoils the bunch? An exploration of broad consumption changes in response to food recalls," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 13-22.
    7. Bakhtavoryan, Rafael & Capps, Oral, Jr. & Salin, Victoria, 2012. "Impact Of Food Contamination On Brands: A Demand Systems Estimation Of Peanut Butter," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 123755, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Pozo, Veronica F. & Schroeder, Ted C., 2016. "Evaluating the costs of meat and poultry recalls to food firms using stock returns," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 66-77.
    9. Bakhtavoryan, Rafael & Capps, Oral, Jr. & Salin, Victoria, 2012. "Impact of Food Contamination on Brands: A Demand Systems Estimation of Peanut Butter," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 41(3), December.

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