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How Does Haccp Change U.S. Seafood Exports?-Analysis With Fishes, Mollusca, And Shellfish Other Than Mollusca

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  • Li, Xiaoqian
  • Saghaian, Sayed H.

Abstract

Although the effect of HACCP on international trade is an issue with many concerns recently, only a few empirical studies focus on the impact of HACCP on U.S seafood export industry. Using the approach of Gravity Model with adjustment of unobserved country characteristics, this paper contributes to analyze the differential effects of HACCP implementation on three kinds of seafood: fishes, mollusca, and shellfish other than mollusca. The results indicate that HACCP application has negative but insignificant effect on seafood exports in the short run. In the long run, HACCP only negatively and significantly affect seafood exports of mollusca and shellfish. Moreover, the higher risk of food born disease seafood has, the easier is seafood trading affected by the enforcement of stricter food safety standards.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Xiaoqian & Saghaian, Sayed H., 2012. "How Does Haccp Change U.S. Seafood Exports?-Analysis With Fishes, Mollusca, And Shellfish Other Than Mollusca," 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama 119859, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea12:119859
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.119859
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/119859/files/SAEA%20ID%2030.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sven M. Anders & Julie A. Caswell, 2007. "Standards as Barriers Versus Standards as Catalysts: Assessing the Impact of HACCP Implementation on U.S. Seafood Imports," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(2), pages 310-321.
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    4. I-Hui Cheng & Howard J. Wall, 2005. "Controlling for heterogeneity in gravity models of trade and integration," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 87(Jan), pages 49-63.
    5. Nguyen, Anh Van Thi & Wilson, Norbert L.W., 2009. "Effects of Food Safety Standards on Seafood Exports to US, EU and Japan," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46758, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Otsuki, Tsunehiro & Wilson, John S. & Sewadeh, Mirvat, 2001. "Saving two in a billion: : quantifying the trade effect of European food safety standards on African exports," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 495-514, October.
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