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Estimating the impact on poverty of Ghana’s fuel subsidy reform and a mitigating response

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  • Hague, Sarah
  • Cooke, Edgar
  • Cockburn, John
  • El Lahga, AbdelRahmen
  • Tiberti, Luca

Abstract

Governments across Africa have faced increasing challenges to maintain fuel subsidies over recent years. In Ghana, in the face of a near 12% fiscal deficit in 2012, their burgeoning cost has drawn attention to questions of fiscal sustainability as well as their overall efficiency and effectiveness. In 2013, the Ghanaian Government would have spent cost 2.4 billion GHS (approximately 1.2 billion USD) on fuel subsidies, equalling 3.2% of GDP and more than half of Ghana's allocation to the entire education sector. Fuel subsidies....
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Suggested Citation

  • Hague, Sarah & Cooke, Edgar & Cockburn, John & El Lahga, AbdelRahmen & Tiberti, Luca, 2014. "Estimating the impact on poverty of Ghana’s fuel subsidy reform and a mitigating response," PEP Working Papers 164187, Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:peppwp:164187
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.164187
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/164187/files/1389903137-PEP-UNICEF-Ghana.WP.2014.public2.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maria Vagliasindi, 2013. "Implementing Energy Subsidy Reforms : Evidence from Developing Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11965, June.
    2. repec:wbk:wbpubs:13081 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Quentin Wodon, 2012. "Improving the Targeting of Social Programs in Ghana," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13082, June.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Bah, Muhammad Maladoh & Saari, M. Yusof, 2020. "Quantifying the impacts of energy price reform on living expenses in Saudi Arabia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 139(C).
    3. Meskoub, M., 2015. "Cash transfer as a social policy instrument or a tool of adjustment policy: from indirect subsidies (to energy and utilities) to cash subsidies in Iran, 2010-2014," ISS Working Papers - General Series 610, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    4. Stefan Bakker & Gary Haq & Karl Peet & Sudhir Gota & Nikola Medimorec & Alice Yiu & Gail Jennings & John Rogers, 2019. "Low-Carbon Quick Wins: Integrating Short-Term Sustainable Transport Options in Climate Policy in Low-Income Countries," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(16), pages 1-17, August.
    5. Cecile Couharde & Sara Mouhoud, 2020. "Fossil Fuel Subsidies, Income Inequality, And Poverty: Evidence From Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(5), pages 981-1006, December.
    6. Bhattacharyya, Ranajoy & Ganguly, Amrita, 2017. "Cross subsidy removal in electricity pricing in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 181-190.
    7. Ragchaasuren Galindev & Tsolmon Baatarzorig & Nyambaatar Batbayar & Delgermaa Begz & Unurjargal Davaa & Oyunzul Tserendorj, 2019. "Impact of Fiscal Consolidation on the Mongolian Economy," Working Papers MPIA 2019-20, PEP-MPIA.
    8. Pu, Lei & Wang, Xiuhui & Tan, Zhongfu & Wang, Huaqing & Yang, JiaCheng & Wu, Jing, 2020. "Is China's electricity price cross-subsidy policy reasonable? Comparative analysis of eastern, central, and western regions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 138(C).

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