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Exploring Domestic Financing Options for Post-2015 Development Agenda in Selected Sub-Saharan African Countries

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  • Eberechukwu Uneze
  • Adedeji Adeniran

Abstract

This paper examines the revenue potential of key domestic financing options currently being proposed for the post-2015 development agenda in five Sub-Sahara Africa countries. The financing options include: tax revenue, domestic savings, capital flight, diaspora resources, financial transaction tax and domestic philanthropy. For the existing financing options, the paper examines the potential of scaling up the present level of revenue. In the case of new financing options, the prospects of, and the scope for, generating revenue are investigated. The paper finds that each country has a strong revenue potential in at least two of the financing options. While this does not suggest that the likely revenue will be enough to meet the financing requirement being proposed for the post-2015 agenda, it demonstrates the viability of domestic resources, and the need to explore them, if only to complement other financing options, especially foreign aid.

Suggested Citation

  • Eberechukwu Uneze & Adedeji Adeniran, 2014. "Exploring Domestic Financing Options for Post-2015 Development Agenda in Selected Sub-Saharan African Countries," Southern Voice Occasional Paper 18, Southern Voice.
  • Handle: RePEc:svo:opaper:18
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    References listed on IDEAS

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