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Does Economic Vulnerability Depend On Place Of Residence? Asset Poverty Across The Rural-Urban Continuum


  • Fisher, Monica G.
  • Weber, Bruce A.


This paper uses Panel Study of Income Dynamics data for 1989, 1994, and 1999 to examine why some U.S. households are asset poor; that is, why households have insufficient resources to invest in their future or to sustain household members at a basic level during times of economic disruption. The study contributes to an improved understanding of asset poverty's correlates by examining the influence of place of residence; the extant literature has focused on individual-level explanations. We estimate a random-effects logistic model of the probability that an individual is asset poor at a given point in time as a function of household-level (e.g. age, gender, race of the household head and family structure) and place-level (regional and rural-urban continuum) variables. The central finding of the paper is that place of residence is an important determinant of asset poverty, above and beyond the influence of household characteristics. We find that living in a central metropolitan county and in a nonmetropolitan area is associated with a higher risk of being asset poor, all else being equal. Implications for future research are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Fisher, Monica G. & Weber, Bruce A., 2004. "Does Economic Vulnerability Depend On Place Of Residence? Asset Poverty Across The Rural-Urban Continuum," Working Papers 18911, Oregon State University, Rural Poverty Research Center (RPRC).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:osruwp:18911

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles Brown & Greg J. Duncan & Frank P. Stafford, 1996. "Data Watch: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 155-168, Spring.
    2. John Iceland, 1997. "Urban labor markets and individual transitions out of poverty," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(3), pages 429-441, August.
    3. Stevens, Ann Huff, 1994. "The Dynamics of Poverty Spells: Updating Bane and Ellwood," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 34-37, May.
    4. Erik Hurst & Ming Ching Luoh & Frank P. Stafford, 1998. "The Wealth Dynamics of American Families, 1984-94," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(1), pages 267-338.
    5. Asena Caner & Ed Wolff, 2002. "Asset Poverty in the United States, 1984-1999: Evidence from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Microeconomics 0209002, EconWPA.
    6. Slesnick, Daniel T, 1993. "Gaining Ground: Poverty in the Postwar United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 1-38, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bola Awotide & Arega Alene & Tahirou Abdoulaye & Victor Manyong, 2015. "Impact of agricultural technology adoption on asset ownership: the case of improved cassava varieties in Nigeria," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 7(6), pages 1239-1258, December.
    2. Marre, Alexander W., 2014. "Rural and Urban Differences in Household Wealth Accumulation: What Role Do Demographics, Wages and Property Values Play?," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170473, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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