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Who Are Proponents And Opponents Of Genetically Modified Foods In The United States?

Author

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  • Ganiere, Pierre
  • Chern, Wen S.
  • Hahn, David E.

Abstract

A national telephone survey was conducted in the U.S. in April 2002 to assess the consumer acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods. Attitudes towards GM foods were studied through the use of a multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) method, analyzing the interrelationships among many variables. This method was combined with a cluster analysis to construct a typology of consumers' attitudes. Four distinct behaviors were finally extracted - proponents, non-opponents, moderate opponents and extreme opponents. We estimated that only 35% of the surveyed population was opposed to GM foods. The consumer attitude towards GM foods was found more complex than the usual acceptance / rejection responses; consumers are looking for incentives and GM proponents are likely to choose the non-GM alternative if no benefit is perceived.

Suggested Citation

  • Ganiere, Pierre & Chern, Wen S. & Hahn, David E., 2004. "Who Are Proponents And Opponents Of Genetically Modified Foods In The United States?," Working Papers 28315, Ohio State University, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ohswps:28315
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.28315
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/28315/files/wp040037.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alexander E. Saak & David A. Hennessy, 2002. "Planting Decisions and Uncertain Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Crop Varieties," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(2), pages 308-319.
    2. Noussair, Charles & Robin, Stephane & Ruffieux, Bernard, 2002. "Do consumers not care about biotech foods or do they just not read the labels?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 47-53, March.
    3. Kinsey, Jean D. & Wolfson, Paul J. & Katsaras, Nikolaos & Senauer, Benjamin, 2001. "Data Mining: A Segmentation Analysis Of U.S. Grocery Shoppers," Working Papers 14335, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
    4. Michael Greenacre, 2008. "Correspondence analysis of raw data," Economics Working Papers 1112, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2009.
    5. Hallman, William K. & Metcalfe, Jennifer, 1994. "Public Perceptions Of Agricultural Biotechnology: A Survey Of New Jersey Residents," Research Reports 18170, Rutgers University, Food Policy Institute.
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