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When the Tide is High: Estimating the Welfare Impact of Coastal Erosion Management

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  • Phillips, Yvonne

Abstract

A choice experiment was undertaken at Buffalo beach, Whitianga, in order to investigate beach visitors’ preferences for various coastal erosion management options. Constructing rock seawalls is a common response to coastal erosion but seawalls can negatively affect visual amenity, biodiversity and recreational values. The choice experiment results from this study show that the average visitor would be willing to pay $20 per year to remove an existing rock wall at either end of Buffalo beach. Visitors place high value on useable sandy beaches and reserve areas behind the beach. A latent class analysis reveals there are distinct sub-groups with varying preferences for beach characteristics. This paper presents a model with separate classes for residents and visitors and the compensating variation estimates to calculate the overall welfare effect for three coastal management scenarios.

Suggested Citation

  • Phillips, Yvonne, 2011. "When the Tide is High: Estimating the Welfare Impact of Coastal Erosion Management," 2011 Conference, August 25-26, 2011, Nelson, New Zealand 115414, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:nzar11:115414
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    1. R.K. Blamey & J.W. Bennett & J.J. Louviere & M.D. Morrison & J.C. Rolfe, 2002. "Attribute Causality in Environmental Choice Modelling," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 23(2), pages 167-186, October.
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    7. Small, Kenneth A & Rosen, Harvey S, 1981. "Applied Welfare Economics with Discrete Choice Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(1), pages 105-130, January.
    8. Vermeulen, Bart & Goos, Peter & Vandebroek, Martina, 2010. "Obtaining more information from conjoint experiments by best-worst choices," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1426-1433, June.
    9. Riccardo Scarpa & Mara Thiene, 2005. "Destination Choice Models for Rock Climbing in the Northeastern Alps: A Latent-Class Approach Based on Intensity of Preferences," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(3).
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    Cited by:

    1. Makriyannis, Christos & Johnston, Robert, 2016. "Welfare Analysis for Climate Risk Reductions: Are Current Treatments of Outcome Uncertainty Sufficient?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235532, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Yue, Ian T. & Swallow, Stephen K., 2014. "Identifying which ecosystem services coastal residents actually value: A choice experiment survey of the Eastern Shore of Virginia regarding climate change adaptation," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 173302, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

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