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The Role of Professional Societies and Process Considerations In Generating Research Priorities: A Case Study from Agricultural Economics

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  • Cordes, Sam

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  • Cordes, Sam, 1997. "The Role of Professional Societies and Process Considerations In Generating Research Priorities: A Case Study from Agricultural Economics," Staff Papers 237384, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Department of Agricultural Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:nbaesp:237384
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.237384
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Huffman, Wallace E. & Evenson, Robert E., 1993. "Science for Agriculture: A Long Term Perspective," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10997, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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