IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/midcwp/93006.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Structure and Behavior of Vegetable Markets Serving Lusaka: Main Report

Author

Listed:
  • Tschirley, David L.
  • Hichaambwa, Munguzwe

Abstract

Rapid growth in urban populations and renewed growth in per capita incomes in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are creating major opportunities for local farmers by driving rapid growth in domestic market demand for food. At the same time, these trends plus rising income are putting enormous stress on the supply chains that these farmers rely on to respond to this increasing demand: demand for marketed food is likely to grow more than 5% per year on the continent, doubling marketed volumes in 12-14 years. Currently, fresh produce marketing systems are the biggest users of public marketing infrastructure, and have been most severely affected by the lack of investment in these systems across much of the continent. This lack of investment has led to an exploding informal marketing sector, rising concerns about congestion and hygiene, and few if any comprehensive programs to actively link farmers to these markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Tschirley, David L. & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe, 2010. "The Structure and Behavior of Vegetable Markets Serving Lusaka: Main Report," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 93006, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:93006
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/93006
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Neven & Thomas Reardon, 2004. "The Rise of Kenyan Supermarkets and the Evolution of their Horticulture Product Procurement Systems," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22(6), pages 669-699, November.
    2. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Tschirley, David L., 2006. "Zambia Horticultural Rapid Appraisal: Understanding the Domestic Value Chains of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54476, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Neven, David & Reardon, Thomas & Chege, Jonathan & Wang, Honglin, 2005. "Supermarkets And Consumers In Africa: The Case Of Nairobi, Kenya," Staff Papers 11584, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Tschirley, David L. & Muendo, Kavoi Mutuku & Weber, Michael T., 2004. "Improving Kenya's Domestic Horticultural Production and Marketing System: Current Competitiveness, Forces of Change, and Challenges for the Future (Volume II: Horticultural Marketing)," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55156, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Tschirley, David L. & Ayieko, Miltone W. & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Goeb, Joey & Loescher, Wayne, 2010. "Modernizing Africa’s Fresh Produce Supply Chains without Rapid Supermarket Takeover: Towards a Definition of Research and Investment Priorities," Food Security International Development Working Papers 93030, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Dinghuan Hu & Thomas Reardon & Scott Rozelle & Peter Timmer & Honglin Wang, 2004. "The Emergence of Supermarkets with Chinese Characteristics: Challenges and Opportunities for China's Agricultural Development," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22, pages 557-586, September.
    7. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z., 2001. "The role of intermediaries in enhancing market efficiency in the Ethiopian grain market," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 311-320, September.
    8. Bart Minten, 2008. "The Food Retail Revolution in Poor Countries: Is It Coming or Is It Over?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 767-789.
    9. W. Bruce Traill, 2006. "The Rapid Rise of Supermarkets?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(2), pages 163-174, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chapoto, Antony & Haggblade, Steven & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Kabwe, Stephen & Longabaugh, Steven & Sitko, Nicholas & Tschirley, David L., 2013. "Institutional Models for Accelerating Agricultural Commercialization: Evidence from Post-Independence Zambia, 1965 to 2012," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 160298, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    2. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe, 2012. "Urban Consumption Patterns of Livestock Products in Zambia and Implications for Policy," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 132343, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Chamberlin, Chamberlin & Kabwe, Stephen, 2015. "Is Smallholder Horticulture the Unfunded Poverty Reduction Option in Zambia? A Comparative Assessment of Welfare Effects of Participation in Horticultural and Maize Markets," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 207022, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Gómez, Miguel I. & Ricketts, Katie D., 2013. "Food value chain transformations in developing countries: Selected hypotheses on nutritional implications," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 139-150.
    5. Chapoto, Antony & Haggblade, Steven & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Kabwe, Stephen & Longabaugh, Steven & Sitko, Nicholas J. & Tschirley, David L., 2012. "Agricultural Transformation in Zambia: Alternative Institutional Models for Accelerating Agricultural Productivity Growth, and Commercialization," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 132339, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; produce; vegetable markets; Zambia; Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Security and Poverty; Marketing;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:93006. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/damsuus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.