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Poverty Reduction Potential of Increasing Smallholder Access to Land

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  • Hichaambwa, Munguzwe
  • Jayne, T. S.

Abstract

Economists have long held that broad-based agricultural growth is the most powerful source of poverty reduction in developing countries where most of the rural population is engaged in agriculture (Johnston and Mellor 1961; Mellor 1974; Lipton 2006). However, in Zambia’s case, despite sustained and fairly robust agricultural growth since 2000, rural poverty levels have remained at about 80% over the past 15 years. This indicates that productivity in the agricultural sector needs to be increased, especially considering that no country, apart from the island economies of Singapore and Hong Kong, has been able to sustain rapid transition out of poverty without raising the productivity in its agricultural sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Jayne, T. S., 2014. "Poverty Reduction Potential of Increasing Smallholder Access to Land," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171873, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:171873
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.171873
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/171873/files/wp83.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jayne, T. S. & Yamano, Takashi & Weber, Michael T. & Tschirley, David & Benfica, Rui & Chapoto, Antony & Zulu, Ballard, 2003. "Smallholder income and land distribution in Africa: implications for poverty reduction strategies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 253-275, June.
    2. Chapoto, Antony & Haggblade, Steven & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Kabwe, Stephen & Longabaugh, Steven & Sitko, Nicholas & Tschirley, David L., 2013. "Institutional Models for Accelerating Agricultural Commercialization: Evidence from Maize, Cotton and Horticulture," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 154940, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Pauw, Karl & Thurlow, James, 2011. "Agricultural growth, poverty, and nutrition in Tanzania," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 795-804.
    4. Klaus Deininger & Derek Byerlee & Jonathan Lindsay & Andrew Norton & Harris Selod & Mercedes Stickler, 2011. "Rising Global Interest in Farmland : Can it Yield Sustainable and Equitable Benefits?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2263, June.
    5. repec:ags:stataj:143014 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Burke, William J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Chapoto, Antony, 2010. "Factors Contributing to Zambia’s 2010 Maize Bumper Harvest," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 97034, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Benedito Cunguara & Gorka Fagilde & James Garrett & Rafael Uaiene, 2012. "Growth Without Change? A Case Study of Economic Transformation in Mozambique," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA), vol. 14(2), pages 105-130.
    8. Michael Lipton, 2006. "Can Small Farmers Survive, Prosper, or be the Key Channel to Cut Mass Poverty?," The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, vol. 3(1), pages 58-85.
    9. Lipton, Michael, 2010. "From Policy Aims and Small-farm Characteristics to Farm Science Needs," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 1399-1412, October.
    10. Michael Lipton, 2006. "Can Small Farmers Survive, Prosper, or be the Key Channel to Cut Mass Poverty?," The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, vol. 3(1), pages 58-85.
    11. Burke, William J., 2009. "Fitting and interpreting Cragg's tobit alternative using Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 9(4), pages 1-9.
    12. James Thurlow & Peter Wobst, 2006. "Not All Growth is Equally Good for the Poor: The Case of Zambia," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(4), pages 603-625, December.
    13. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav, 2002. "Why has economic growth been more pro-poor in some states of India than others?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 381-400, August.
    14. Quan, Nguyen T. & Koo, Anthony Y. C., 1985. "Concentration of land holdings : An empirical exploration of Kuznets' conjecture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 101-117.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul C. Samboko & Mitelo Subakanya & Cliff Dlamini, 2017. "Potential biofuel feedstocks and production in Zambia," WIDER Working Paper Series 047, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0872-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Chamberlin, Chamberlin & Kabwe, Stephen, 2015. "Is Smallholder Horticulture the Unfunded Poverty Reduction Option in Zambia? A Comparative Assessment of Welfare Effects of Participation in Horticultural and Maize Markets," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 207022, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Chamberlin, Jordan & Sitko, Nicholas J, 2015. "Determinants and welfare effects of smallholder participation in horticultural markets in Zambia," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(4), pages 1-18, December.
    5. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0700-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Jayne, T.S., 2014. "Can Increasing Smallholder Farm Size Broadly Reduce Rural Poverty in Zambia?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 171876, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty; Land Economics/Use;

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