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Factors Contributing to Zambia's 2010 Maize Bumper Harvest

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  • Burke, William J.
  • Jayne, Thomas S.
  • Chapoto, Antony

Abstract

Zambia’s maize crop grew by roughly 48% between the 2009 and 2010 harvests, leading to the largest crop recorded in recent history. The 2009 maize harvest was also very good, making the 48% rise in 2010 even more remarkable. The forces driving that increase, however, remain widely debated. Many in government and media have attributed the recent production increase to the government’s fertilizer subsidy program as well as to the state’s recent efforts to raise maize prices through the operations of the Food Reserve Agency. Others have argued that the bumper harvest is partially due to the adoption of conservation farming techniques by farmers. Still others attribute the maize production growth mainly to favorable weather. Unfortunately, none of these claims have been backed up by solid evidence-based research.

Suggested Citation

  • Burke, William J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Chapoto, Antony, 2010. "Factors Contributing to Zambia's 2010 Maize Bumper Harvest," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 97036, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:97036
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.97036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Haggblade, Steven & Tembo, Gelson, 2003. "Development, Diffusion and Impact of Conservation Farming in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54464, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Minot, Nicholas, 2003. "Income Diversification And Poverty Reduction In The Northern Uplands Of Vietnam," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22029, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    Cited by:

    1. Kelvin Mulungu & Gelson Tembo & Hilary Bett & Hambulo Ngoma, 2021. "Climate change and crop yields in Zambia: historical effects and future projections," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 23(8), pages 11859-11880, August.
    2. Nkonde, Chewe & Mason, Nicole M. & Sitko, Nicholas J. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Who Gained and Who Lost from Zambia's 2010 Maize Marketing Policies?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 99610, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Smallholder Commercialization Trends as Affected by Land Constraints in Zambia: What Are the Policy Implications?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 123211, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Melkani, Aakanksha & Mason, Nicole & Mather, David & Chisanga, Brian & Jayne, Thom, 2021. "Smallholder Market Participation and Choice of Marketing Channel in the Presence of Liquidity Constraints: Evidence from Zambian Maize Markets," 2021 Conference, August 17-31, 2021, Virtual 315273, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Blessings Chinsinga & Colin Poulton, 2014. "Beyond Technocratic Debates: The Significance and Transience of Political Incentives in the Malawi Farm Input Subsidy Programme (FISP)," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(s2), pages 123-150, September.
    6. Chapoto, Antony & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Zambian Farmers’ Access to Maize Markets," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 116910, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Trends in Maize Grain, Roller and Breakfast Meal Prices In Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 116908, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Shipekesa, Arthur M. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "The 2011 Surplus in Smallholder Maize Production in Zambia: Drivers, Beneficiaries, & Implications for Agricultural & Poverty Reduction Policies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 118477, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Jayne, T. S., 2014. "Poverty Reduction Potential of Increasing Smallholder Access to Land," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171873, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    10. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Darko, Francis Addeah & Tembo, Solomon, 2013. "What are the effects of input subsidy programs on equilibrium maize prices? Evidence from Malawi and Zambia," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161264, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    11. Kelvin Mulungu & Gelson Tembo, 2015. "Effects of Weather Variability on Crop Abandonment," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 7(3), pages 1-13, March.
    12. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Mason, Nicole M. & Darko, Francis & Jayne, Thomas S. & Tembo, Solomon, 2013. "What are the Effects of Input Subsidies on Maize Prices? Evidence from Malawi and Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 154938, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    13. Andreas Gerber, 2016. "Short-Term Success versus Long-Term Failure: A Simulation-Based Approach for Understanding the Potential of Zambia’s Fertilizer Subsidy Program in Enhancing Maize Availability," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 8(10), pages 1-17, October.

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