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Development, Diffusion and Impact of Conservation Farming in Zambia

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  • Haggblade, Steven
  • Tembo, Gelson

Abstract

The study reported in this paper measures differences in profitability between conservation farming (CF) practices and conventional agriculture by comparing the value of differential output with the differential input costs. The main objective is to address and fill several important knowledge gaps by investigating three key features of conservation farming in Zambia: 1) the process by which CF originated and spread; 2) the scale of CF adoption across household groups and regions; and 3) the impact of CF on crop output, input use, cost of production and farm income.

Suggested Citation

  • Haggblade, Steven & Tembo, Gelson, 2003. "Development, Diffusion and Impact of Conservation Farming in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54464, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:54464
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/54464
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zulu, Ballard & Nijhoff, Jan J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Negassa, Asfaw, 2000. "Is the Glass Half-Empty or Half Full? An Analysis of Agricultural Production Trends in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54458, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Haggblade, Steven & Tembo, Gelson, 2003. "Conservation farming in Zambia:," EPTD discussion papers 108, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Grabowski, Philip P. & Haggblade, Steven & Kabwe, Stephen & Tembo, Gelson, 2014. "Minimum tillage adoption among commercial smallholder cotton farmers in Zambia, 2002 to 2011," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 34-44.
    2. Smale, Melinda & Byerlee, Derek & Jayne, Thom S., 2011. "Maize Revolutions in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 202592, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
    3. Ngoma, Hambulo & Mulenga, Brian P. & Jayne, T.S., 2014. "What Explains Minimal Usage of Minimum Tillage Practices in Zambia? Evidence from District-representative Data," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 171875, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Burke, William J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Chapoto, Antony, 2010. "Factors Contributing to Zambia's 2010 Maize Bumper Harvest," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 97036, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Chapoto, Antony & Haggblade, Steven & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Kabwe, Stephen & Longabaugh, Steven & Sitko, Nicholas & Tschirley, David L., 2013. "Institutional Models for Accelerating Agricultural Commercialization: Evidence from Post-Independence Zambia, 1965 to 2012," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 160298, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    6. Kabwe, Stephen & Donovan, Cynthia & Samazaka, David, 2006. "Assessment of the Farm Level Agronomic and Financial Benefits of the Magoye Ripper in Maize and Cotton Production in Southern and Eastern Provinces," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54623, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Ngoma, Hambulo & Mason, Nicole M. & Sitko, Nicholas, 2015. "Does Minimum Tillage with Planting Basins or Ripping Raise Maize Yields? Meso-panel Data Evidence from Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 198701, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. Kabwe, Stephen & Donovan, Cynthia & Samazaka, David, 2007. "Assessment of the Farm Level Financial Profitability of the Magoye RipperiIn Maize and Cotton Production in Southern and Eastern Provinces," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54482, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Haggblade, Steven, 2007. "Returns to Investment in Agriculture," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54625, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    10. Chapoto, Antony & Haggblade, Steven & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe & Kabwe, Stephen & Longabaugh, Steven & Sitko, Nicholas J. & Tschirley, David L., 2012. "Agricultural Transformation in Zambia: Alternative Institutional Models for Accelerating Agricultural Productivity Growth, and Commercialization," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 132339, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    11. Nyanga, Progress H., 2012. "Factors Influencing Adoption and Area under Conservation Agriculture: A Mixed Methods Approach," Sustainable Agriculture Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 1(2).
    12. Ngoma, Hambulo & Mulenga, Brian P. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2013. "Determinants and Extent of Use of Minimum Tillage Practices among Zambian Smallholder Crop Farmers from 2008 to 2012," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161210, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    13. repec:eee:agisys:v:153:y:2017:i:c:p:11-22 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food security; food policy; conservation farming; Zambia; conventional agriculture; Farm Management; Land Economics/Use; Q18;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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