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The Spartan School Of Institutional Economics At Michigan State University


  • Schmid, A. Allan


Heterodox scholarship at Michigan State University (MSU) was influenced by the institutional economics of John R. Commons at Wisconsin. But it was far from monolithic and had many other sources and originality of its own. A case can be made that the center of institutional economics moved across Lake Michigan from Madison to East Lansing and blossomed in the second half of the 20th century with such Wisconsin Ph.D's as Raleigh Barlowe, Warren Samuels, Allan Schmid, Harry Trebing, and others. Equally important in making MSU a center of institutional economics were scholars from other institutional backgrounds such as Paul Strassmann, economic development; Robert Solo, science and technology; James Shaffer, agricultural marketing and consumer behavior; Nicholas Mercuro, law and economics; and others.

Suggested Citation

  • Schmid, A. Allan, 2002. "The Spartan School Of Institutional Economics At Michigan State University," Staff Papers 11596, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11596

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jayne, T. S. & Yamano, Takashi & Weber, Michael T. & Tschirley, David & Benfica, Rui & Chapoto, Antony & Zulu, Ballard, 2003. "Smallholder income and land distribution in Africa: implications for poverty reduction strategies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 253-275, June.
    2. Warren J. Samuels & Steven G. Medema & A. A. Schmid, 1997. "The Economy as a Process of Valuation," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1088.
    3. Woodbury, Stephen A., 2000. "Economics, economists, and public policy," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 417-430.
    4. Batie, Sandra S. & Ervin, David E., 2001. "Transgenic crops and the environment: missing markets and public roles," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(04), pages 435-457, October.
    5. Judith I. Stallmann & A. Allan Schmid, 1987. "Property Rights in Plants: Implications for Biotechnology Research and Extension," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 69(2), pages 432-437.
    6. Warren J. Samuels, 1989. "Determinate Solutions and Valuational Processes: Overcoming the Foreclosure of Process," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 531-546, July.
    7. Hugh Spall, 1978. "State tax structure and the supply of AFDC assistance," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 85-96, December.
    8. Staatz, John M., 1989. "Farmer Cooperative Theory: Recent Developments," Research Reports 52017, United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development Business and Cooperative Programs.
    9. Bronfrenbrenner, Martin, 1985. "Early American Leaders-Institutional and Critical Traditions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(6), pages 13-27, December.
    10. Samuels, Warren J., 1996. "My Work as a Historian of Economic Thought," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(01), pages 37-75, March.
    11. Robison, Lindon J. & Schmid, A. Allan, 1994. "Can Agriculture Prosper Without Increased Social Capital?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 9(4).
    12. Jeff E. Biddle, 1990. "Purpose and Evolution in Commons's Institutionalism," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 19-47, Spring.
    13. Harvey, Lynn R., 1994. "Joint Public Ventures Cost Allocation: Alternative And Consequences," Staff Papers 11783, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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