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Trends and Determinants of Cereal Productivity Growth in Southern Africa Region: A DEA and Cointegration Approach

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  • Onoja, Anthony

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  • Onoja, Anthony, 2021. "Trends and Determinants of Cereal Productivity Growth in Southern Africa Region: A DEA and Cointegration Approach," 2021 Conference, August 17-31, 2021, Virtual 315915, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae21:315915
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.315915
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    Keywords

    Productivity Analysis; Crop Production/Industries;

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