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Institutions and Agricultural Productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Lilyan E. Fulginiti

    (University of Nebraska)

  • Richard K. Perrin

    (University of Nebraska)

  • Bingxin Yu

    (University of Nebraska)

Agricultural productivity in 41 Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries from 1960 to 1999 is examined by estimating a semi-nonparametric Fourier production frontier. Over the four decades the estimated rate of productivity change was 0.83% per year, although the average rate from 1985-99 was a strong 1.90% per year. Former UK colonies exhibited significantly higher productivity gains than others, while Liberia and countries that had been colonies of Portugal or Belgium exhibited net reductions in productivity. We measure a significant reduction in productivity during political conflicts and wars, and a significant increase in productivity among those countries with higher levels of political rights and civil liberties.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0502/0502021.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0502021.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 28 Feb 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0502021
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 23. Agricultural Economics, December 2004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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  1. Bertocchi, Graziella & Canova, Fabio, 1996. "Did Colonization Matter for Growth? An Empirical Exploration into the Historical Causes of Africa's Underdevelopment," CEPR Discussion Papers 1444, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Meeusen, Wim & van den Broeck, Julien, 1977. "Efficiency Estimation from Cobb-Douglas Production Functions with Composed Error," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 18(2), pages 435-44, June.
  3. Lilyan E. Fulginiti & Richard K. Perrin & Bingxin Yu, 2005. "Institutions and Agricultural Productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa," Development and Comp Systems 0502021, EconWPA.
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  7. Frisvold, George & Ingram, Kevin, 1995. "Sources of agricultural productivity growth and stagnation in sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 51-61, October.
  8. Gallant, A. Ronald, 1981. "On the bias in flexible functional forms and an essentially unbiased form : The fourier flexible form," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 211-245, February.
  9. Frisvold, George & Ingram, Kevin, 1995. "Sources of agricultural productivity growth and stagnation in sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(1), October.
  10. Battese, G E & Coelli, T J, 1995. "A Model for Technical Inefficiency Effects in a Stochastic Frontier Production Function for Panel Data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 325-32.
  11. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
  12. World Bank, 2002. "African Development Indicators 2002," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13922.
  13. Chan-Kang, Connie & Pardey, Philip G. & Wood, Stanley & Roseboom, Johannes & Cremers, Marleen, 1999. "Reassessing Productivity Growth In African Agriculture," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21600, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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