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Long-term Impacts of Rice Price and Production Seasonality on Human Capital: Evidence from Rural Indonesia

  • Yamauchi, Futoshi

This paper examines the impacts of prenatal conditions on child growth using recent data from Indonesia. There is seasonality in birthweight: This measure is significantly higher immediately after the main rice harvest in the country. The empirical results show that an increase in birthweight improves child growth outcomes as measured by the height and weight z-scores, as well as schooling performance as measured by age at start of schooling and number of grades repeated. The interactions of ecological variations affect early childhood human capital formation and can have long-term impacts on children’s outcomes.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126163
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Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil with number 126163.

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Date of creation: Aug 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126163
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  1. Robert M. Townsend, . "Risk and Insurance in Village India," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 91-3a, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  2. Sandra E Black & Paul J Devereux & Kjell G Salvanes, 2007. "From the Cradle to the Labor Market? The Effect of Birth Weight on Adult Outcomes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 122(1), pages 409-439, 02.
  3. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Muto, Megumi & Chowdhury, Shyamal & Dewina, Reno & Sumaryanto, Sony, 2011. "Are Schooling and Roads Complementary? Evidence from Income Dynamics in Rural Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2232-2244.
  4. Ligon, Ethan & Schechter, Laura, 2002. "Measuring Vulnerability," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19899, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  5. Reyn van Ewijk, 2009. "Long-Term Health Effects on the Next Generation of Ramadan Fasting During Pregnancy," CEP Discussion Papers dp0926, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Paxson, Christina H, 1993. "Consumption and Income Seasonality in Thailand," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 39-72, February.
  7. Lokshin , Michael & Radyakin, Sergiy, 2009. "Month of Birth and Children's Health in India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4813, The World Bank.
  8. Harold Alderman & Jere R. Behrman, 2006. "Reducing the Incidence of Low Birth Weight in Low-Income Countries Has Substantial Economic Benefits," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 21(1), pages 25-48.
  9. Jere Behrman & Mark Rosenzweig & Andrew D. Foster, . "The Dynamics of Agricultural Production and the Calorie-Income Relationship: Evidence from Pakistan," Home Pages _069, University of Pennsylvania.
  10. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Sumaryanto, Sony & Dewina, Reno, 2010. "Climate Change, Perceptions and the Heterogeneity of Adaptation and Rice Productivity: Evidence from Indonesian Villages," Working Papers 13, JICA Research Institute.
  11. Alderman,Harold & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2003. "Long-term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," FCND discussion papers 168, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  12. Kasey S. Buckles & Daniel M. Hungerman, 2013. "Season of Birth and Later Outcomes: Old Questions, New Answers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(3), pages 711-724, July.
  13. Douglas Almond & Bhashkar Mazumder, 2011. "Health Capital and the Prenatal Environment: The Effect of Ramadan Observance during Pregnancy," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 56-85, October.
  14. Lee, Lung-fei & Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Pitt, Mark M., 1997. "The effects of improved nutrition, sanitation, and water quality on child health in high-mortality populations," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 209-235, March.
  15. World Bank, 2011. "World Development Indicators 2011," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2315.
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