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Extending the Public Sector in the ICES Model with an Explicit Government Institution

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  • Delpiazzo, Elisa
  • Parrado, Ramiro
  • Standardi, Gabriele

Abstract

This paper aims to present an extension of the ICES model to capture the public sector. Departing from a demand system mainly derived from the GTAP model, ICES-XPS model disentangles the private and the public actors. The paper reviews the changes in both the database and the model equations following the existing literature and considering the availability of data as well. The model is then tested with a series of simple experiments to highlight its contribution to economic analysis in which the public sector may play an important role. Finally, we show the flexibility in the closure rule of the public sector that allows addressing different policy research questions.

Suggested Citation

  • Delpiazzo, Elisa & Parrado, Ramiro & Standardi, Gabriele, 2017. "Extending the Public Sector in the ICES Model with an Explicit Government Institution," EIA: Climate Change: Economic Impacts and Adaptation 254041, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:feemei:254041
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.254041
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/254041/files/NDL2017-011.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lofgren, Hans & Cicowiez, Martin & Diaz-Bonilla, Carolina, 2013. "MAMS – A Computable General Equilibrium Model for Developing Country Strategy Analysis," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, in: Peter B. Dixon & Dale Jorgenson (ed.), Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 159-276, Elsevier.
    2. Orecchia, Carlo & Parrado, Ramiro, 2013. "A Quantitative Assessment of the Implications of Including non-CO2 Emissions in the European ETS," Climate Change and Sustainable Development 162416, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    3. Eboli, Fabio & Parrado, Ramiro & Roson, Roberto, 2010. "Climate-change feedback on economic growth: explorations with a dynamic general equilibrium model," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(5), pages 515-533, October.
    4. Osberghaus, Daniel & Reif, Christiane, 2010. "Total costs and budgetary effects of adaptation to climate change: An assessment for the European Union," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-046, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    5. World Bank, 2010. "Economics of Adaptation to Climate Change : Synthesis Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12750, The World Bank.
    6. Pyatt, Graham & Round, Jeffrey I, 1977. "Social Accounting Matrices for Development Planning," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 23(4), pages 339-364, December.
    7. Peterson, Everett B. & Schleich, Joachim & Duscha, Vicki, 2011. "Environmental and economic effects of the Copenhagen pledges and more ambitious emission reduction targets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3697-3708, June.
    8. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • H60 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - General

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