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Total Costs and Budgetary Effects of Adaptation to Climate Change: An Assessment for the European Union

Author

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  • Daniel Osberghaus
  • Christiane Reif

Abstract

Adaptation to climate change is gaining increasing relevance in the public debate of climate policy. However, detailed and regionalised cost estimates as a basis for cost-benefit-analyses are rare. We compose available cost estimates for adaptation in Europe, and in particular Germany, Finland and Italy. Furthermore, a systematic overview on fiscal aspects of adaptation is provided, with focus on budgetary effects of adaptation in the different impact sectors. Combining cost estimates, considerations on fiscal aspects and governmental interventions in adaptation processes, we present data-based guesses of public adaptation costs in the EU, divided by impact sectors. The findings show an expectedly large public burden in the adaptation of transport infrastructure and coastal protection, while high adaptation costs in the agriculture sector are predominantly private. The change in energy demand may well lead to a significant decrease in public expenditure. Considering the regional heterogeneity of adaptation measures and the high uncertainty of quantitative adaptation analyses, further research in the form of bottom-up-studies is needed.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Osberghaus & Christiane Reif, 2010. "Total Costs and Budgetary Effects of Adaptation to Climate Change: An Assessment for the European Union," CESifo Working Paper Series 3143, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3143
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kelly C. de Bruin & Rob B. Dellink, 2009. "How Harmful are Adaptation Restrictions," Working Papers 2009.58, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
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    Cited by:

    1. Claus Doll & Christian Trinks & Norbert Sedlacek & Verena Pelikan & Tina Comes & Frank Schultmann, 2014. "Adapting rail and road networks to weather extremes: case studies for southern Germany and Austria," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 72(1), pages 63-85, May.
    2. Keen, Michael & Kotsogiannis, Christos, 2014. "Coordinating climate and trade policies: Pareto efficiency and the role of border tax adjustments," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 119-128.
    3. Leppänen, Simo & Solanko, Laura & Kosonen, Riitta, 2015. "Could climate change affect government expenditures? Early evidence from the Russian regions," BOFIT Discussion Papers 27/2015, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    4. Elsayyad, May & Konrad, Kai A., 2012. "Fighting multiple tax havens," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 295-305.
    5. repec:kap:enreec:v:67:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10640-015-9977-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Li, Zhengtao & Folmer, Henk & Xue, Jianhong, 2014. "To what extent does air pollution affect happiness? The case of the Jinchuan mining area, China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 88-99.
    7. Heuson, Clemens & Gawel, Erik & Gebhardt, Oliver & Hansjürgens, Bernd & Lehmann, Paul & Meyer, Volker & Schwarze, Reimund, 2012. "Fundamental questions on the economics of climate adaptation: Outlines of a new research programme," UFZ Reports 05/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ).
    8. Benjamin Jones & Michael Keen & Jon Strand, 2013. "Fiscal implications of climate change," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(1), pages 29-70, February.
    9. Heuson, Clemens & Gawel, Erik & Gebhardt, Oliver & Hansjürgens, Bernd & Lehmann, Paul & Meyer, Volker & Schwarze, Reimund, 2012. "Ökonomische Grundfragen der Klimaanpassung: Umrisse eines neuen Forschungsprogramms," UFZ Reports 02/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ).
    10. Gabriel Bachner & Birgit Bednar-Friedl, 2016. "Counterbalancing the Effects of Climate Change Adaptation on Public Budgets: Factor Taxes, Transfers, or Foreign Lending?," Graz Economics Papers 2016-07, University of Graz, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    adaptation; climate change; adaptation costs; fiscal effects; governmental intervention;

    JEL classification:

    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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