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Thirty Years of Agricultural Transition in China (1977-2007) and the "New Rural Campaign"

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  • Jia, Xiangping
  • Fock, Achim

Abstract

Agriculture in China has experienced a compelling growth in the early 1980s, a buoyant upbeat in the early 1990s, and an extended period of low growth after 1995. Decollectivization, mar-ket reforms, public investments and technology have played a critical role during this overall successful process. However, the transition has also led to increasing inequalities between the agricultural and non-agricultural population, and substantial institutional issues remain to be fully addressed. The Chinese government is now reemphasizing agriculture and rural develop-ment under its New Rural Campaign with the objective to address rural-urban inequalities, but a stronger emphasis on participation and tenure reforms is warranted.

Suggested Citation

  • Jia, Xiangping & Fock, Achim, 2007. "Thirty Years of Agricultural Transition in China (1977-2007) and the "New Rural Campaign"," 106th Seminar, October 25-27, 2007, Montpellier, France 7953, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa106:7953
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pei Guo & Xiangping Jia, 2009. "The structure and reform of rural finance in China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(2), pages 212-226, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agriculture; rural development; transition; institutions; China; Community/Rural/Urban Development; International Development; O43; P21; P32;

    JEL classification:

    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P32 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Collectives; Communes; Agricultural Institutions

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