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Climate Change Awareness And Decision On Adaptation Measures By Livestock Farmers

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  • Mandleni, B.
  • Anim, F.D.K.

Abstract

This paper investigated the extent of awareness of climate change by livestock farmers in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. It further explored the choice of adaptation measures that were followed and factors that affected adaption measures. The results indicated that marital status, level of education, formal extension, temperatures and the way in which land was acquired, significantly affected awareness of climate change. Variables that significantly affected adaptation selections were gender, formal extension, information received about climate change, temperatures and 2 the way in which land was acquired. The study suggested that the positive and significant variables that affected awareness and adaptation measures by livestock farmers be considered when awareness and adaptation strategies are implemented.

Suggested Citation

  • Mandleni, B. & Anim, F.D.K., 2011. "Climate Change Awareness And Decision On Adaptation Measures By Livestock Farmers," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108794, Agricultural Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc11:108794
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/108794
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Katsushi Imai, 2003. "Is Livestock Important for Risk Behaviour and Activity Choice of Rural Households? Evidence from Kenya," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(2), pages 271-295, June.
    2. Luseno, Winnie K. & McPeak, John G. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Little, Peter D. & Gebru, Getachew, 2003. "Assessing the Value of Climate Forecast Information for Pastoralists: Evidence from Southern Ethiopia and Northern Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(9), pages 1477-1494, September.
    3. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    4. Yesuf, Mahmud & Di Falco, Salvatore & Deressa, Temesgen & Ringler, Claudia & Kohlin, Gunnar, 2008. "The impact of climate change and adaptation on food production in low-income countries: Evidence from the Nile Basin, Ethiopia [in Amharic]," Research briefs 15(11)AMH, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Yesuf, Mahmud & di Falco, Salvatore & Deressa, Temesgen & Ringler, Claudia & Kohlin, Gunnar, 2008. "The impact of climate change and adaptation on food production in low-income countries: Evidence from the Nile Basin, Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 828, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. D'Emden, Francis H. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Burton, Michael P., 2008. "Factors influencing adoption of conservation tillage in Australian cropping regions," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(2), June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Muatha, Irene Teresia & Otieno, David Jakinda & Nyikal, Rose Adhiambo, 2016. "Factors influencing smallholder farmers’ awareness of agricultural extension devolution in Kenya: a binary logit analysis," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246283, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change awareness; Heckman’s two step probit model; decisions to adapt; Farm Management;

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