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Productivity Growth in Thailand and Indonesia: How Agriculture Contributes to Economic Growth

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  • Warr, Peter G.

Abstract

Total factor productivity growth in the agricultural, industry and services sectors is studied in this paper for two countries: Thailand and Indonesia, over the period 1981 to 2002. A feature of the analysis is the decomposition of aggregate total factor productivity growth into two components: productivity growth in individual sectors; and the reallocation of resources from low productivity to high productivity sectors. The results show that in both countries virtually all factor productivity growth at the sectoral level derives from agriculture, but the reallocation of resources away from agriculture was a much larger source of aggregate productivity growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Warr, Peter G., 2006. "Productivity Growth in Thailand and Indonesia: How Agriculture Contributes to Economic Growth," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 139925, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare06:139925
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.139925
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jojo Jacob & Christoph Meister, 2005. "Productivity gains, technology spillovers and trade: Indonesian manufacturing, 1980-96," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 37-56.
    2. Jorgenson, Dale W, 1988. "Productivity and Postwar U.S. Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 23-41, Fall.
    3. David Vines & Peter Warr, 2003. "Thailand's investment-driven boom and crisis," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(3), pages 440-466, July.
    4. Marcel Timmer, 1999. "Indonesia's Ascent on the Technology Ladder: Capital Stock and Total Factor Productivity in Indonesian Manufacturing, 1975-95," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 75-97.
    5. H. Aswicahyono & H. Hill, 2002. "'Perspiration' vs 'Inspiration' in Asian Industrialisation: Indonesia Before the Crisis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(3), pages 138-163.
    6. Young, Alwyn, 1994. "Lessons from the East Asian NICS: A contrarian view," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 964-973, April.
    7. Keith Fuglie, 2004. "Productivity growth in Indonesian agriculture, 1961-2000," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(2), pages 209-225.
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    Cited by:

    1. Upali Wickramasinghe, 2016. "Fostering productivity in the rural and agricultural sector for inclusive growth and sustainable development in Asia and the Pacific Abstract:," MPDD Working Paper Series WP/16/07, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).
    2. Akintoye Victor Adejumo & Oluwabunmi Opeyemi Adejumo, 2019. "Role of Productivity Growth in Economic Growth: Evidence from Nigeria (1970–2010)," Global Business Review, International Management Institute, vol. 20(6), pages 1324-1343, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Relations/Trade; Productivity Analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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