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Hysteresis And The Shortage Of Agricultural Labor

  • Bryant, Amy
  • Richards, Timothy J.

The GAO disputes growers' claims of a labor shortage, using unreliable farm employment data rather than relative wages. A shortage, implying a failure of intersectoral arbitrage, may arise due to hysteresis in labor movement. Estimates find the probability of a farm labor shortage (30%) three times that of a surplus.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/20858
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Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT with number 20858.

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Date of creation: 1998
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea98:20858
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  1. Dixit, Avinash K, 1989. "Entry and Exit Decisions under Uncertainty," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(3), pages 620-38, June.
  2. Cross, Rod, 1993. "On the Foundations of Hysteresis in Economic Systems," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(01), pages 53-74, April.
  3. Boyan Jovanovic & Robert Moffitt, 1990. "An Estimate of a Sectoral Model of Labor Mobility," NBER Working Papers 3227, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. repec:cdl:agrebk:677080 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Perloff, Jeffrey M, 1990. "The impact of wage differentials on choosing to work in agriculture," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt68j399k8, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
  6. Rod Cross & Michael Grinfeld & Laura Piscitelli, 1999. "Hysteresis in Economic Systems," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 723, Society for Computational Economics.
  7. Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1991. "Wage gaps between farm and city: Michigan in the 1890s," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 381-408, October.
  8. Bob Baulch, 1997. "Transfer Costs, Spatial Arbitrage, and Testing for Food Market Integration," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(2), pages 477-487.
  9. Jaeger, Albert & Parkinson, Martin, 1990. "Testing for Hysteresis in Unemployment: An Unobserved Components Approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 185-98.
  10. Kling, Catherine L. & Sexton, Richard & Carman, Hoy, 1991. "Market Integration, Efficiency of Arbitrage, and Imperfect Competition: Methodology and Application to U.S. Celery," Staff General Research Papers 1609, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  11. Spiller, Pablo T & Huang, Cliff J, 1986. "On the Extent of the Market: Wholesale Gasoline in the Northeastern United States," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(2), pages 131-45, December.
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