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Factor And Product Market Tradability And Equilibrium In Pacific Rim Pork Industries

  • Barrett, Christopher B.
  • Li, Jau-Rong
  • Bailey, DeeVon

This study uses a new market analysis methodology to examine price and trade relationships in eight Pacific Rim factor and product markets central to the Canadian and U.S. pork industries. The new method enables direct estimation of the frequencies with which a variety of market conditions occur, including competitive equilibrium, tradability, and segmented equilibrium. While extraordinary profit opportunities emerge episodically in a few niche markets, the vast majority of the markets studies are highly competitive- exhibiting zero estimated marginal profits to spatial arbitrage at monthly frequency- and internationally contestable. With a few notable exceptions due primarily to nontariff barriers, and despite significant remaining tariffs in some niches, the Pacific Rim is effectively a single market for pork producers and processors today.

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Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2000)
Issue (Month): 01 (July)

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:30829
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  1. Pinelopi K. Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1996. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," NBER Working Papers 5862, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Kling, Catherine L. & Sexton, Richard & Carman, Hoy, 1991. "Market Integration, Efficiency of Arbitrage, and Imperfect Competition: Methodology and Application to U.S. Celery," Staff General Research Papers 1609, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Christopher B. Barrett, 1996. "Market Analysis Methods: Are Our Enriched Toolkits Well Suited to Enlivened Markets?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 825-829.
  4. Bob Baulch, 1997. "Transfer Costs, Spatial Arbitrage, and Testing for Food Market Integration," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(2), pages 477-487.
  5. McNew, Kevin & Fackler, Paul L., 1997. "Testing Market Equilibrium: Is Cointegration Informative?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 22(02), December.
  6. Li, Jau-Rong & Barrett, Christopher B., 1999. "Distinguishing Between Equilibrium And Integration In Markets Analysis," Working Papers 14607, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
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