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Can Index Insurance Improve Credit Access Among Smallhodler Farmers In Ghana? Does It Differ Over Male And Female Farmers?

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  • Mishra, Khushbu
  • Gallenstein, Richard
  • Miranda, Mario J
  • Sam, Abdoul G
  • Toledo, Patricia T

Abstract

The majority of the world’s poor live in rural areas and rely on agriculture for their income. Therefore, increasing agricultural efficiency via technology adoption is critical to reducing poverty in developing agrarian economies such as those in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Despite its apparent advantages, SSA has one of the lowest adoption rates. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to investigate if the availability of meso-and micro-level insurance encourages access to credit by relaxing demand side and supply side constraints. We further disaggregate the effects by gender of the farmer to see if any differential impacts exist over female versus male farmers. Using a randomized control trial and difference-in-difference estimation, we find that availability of meso-level insurance, when the banks are the policy holders, increases the likelihood of agricultural loan approvals for smallholder farmers. Gender level analysis shows that the likelihood increases for both female and male farmers.

Suggested Citation

  • Mishra, Khushbu & Gallenstein, Richard & Miranda, Mario J & Sam, Abdoul G & Toledo, Patricia T, 2016. "Can Index Insurance Improve Credit Access Among Smallhodler Farmers In Ghana? Does It Differ Over Male And Female Farmers?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 239853, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea16:239853
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.239853
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/239853/files/AAEA2016_Mishra%20et%20al..pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bourdillon, Michael & Hebinck, Paul & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill & Marondo, John & Mudege, Netsayi & Owens, Trudy, 2003. "Assessing the impact of high-yielding varieties of maize in resettlement areas of Zimbabwe," FCND briefs 161, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Andre Croppenstedt & Mulat Demeke & Meloria M. Meschi, 2003. "Technology Adoption in the Presence of Constraints: the Case of Fertilizer Demand in Ethiopia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(1), pages 58-70, February.
    3. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 35-69, March.
    4. Breisinger, Clemens & Diao, Xinshen & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Al Hassan, Ramatu & Thurlow, James, 2011. "A new era of transformation in Ghana: Lessons from the past and scenarios for the future," Research reports 978-0-89629-788-3, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Cheryl Doss, 2006. "The Effects of Intrahousehold Property Ownership on Expenditure Patterns in Ghana," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(1), pages 149-180, March.
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    Cited by:

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    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty; International Development; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Risk and Uncertainty;
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