IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aaea15/206550.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Gender and Dynamics of Technology Adoption: Evidence from Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Mishra, Khushbu
  • Abdoul, Sam G.
  • Miranda, Mario J.
  • Diiro, Gracious M.

Abstract

Technology adoption is seen as an important tool for increasing agricultural efficiency and combating food insecurity. Despite this theory, Sub-Saharan Africa, which suffers from one of the highest rates of food insecurity, has one of the lowest rates of technology adoption. This is especially prevalent among female headed households. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to investigate the dynamics of technology adoption at household level and further disaggregate it by gender. Using four waves of Ugandan household level panel data, we find that technology adoption in the first period is the primary determinant of technology adoption in the subsequent periods. Gender level analysis shows that this finding is dominant by male headed households who make the majority of the sample. In contrast, lagged technology adoption is the main driver of adoption for female headed households.

Suggested Citation

  • Mishra, Khushbu & Abdoul, Sam G. & Miranda, Mario J. & Diiro, Gracious M., 2015. "Gender and Dynamics of Technology Adoption: Evidence from Uganda," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 206550, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea15:206550
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.206550
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/206550/files/Mishra%20et%20al._AAEA_July27-29.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.22004/ag.econ.206550?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Esther Duflo & Michael Kremer & Jonathan Robinson, 2008. "How High Are Rates of Return to Fertilizer? Evidence from Field Experiments in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 482-488, May.
    2. Cheryl R. Doss & Michael L. Morris, 2000. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), pages 27-39, June.
    3. Xingliang Ma & Guanming Shi, 2015. "A dynamic adoption model with Bayesian learning: an application to U.S. soybean farmers," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(1), pages 25-38, January.
    4. Omamo, Steven Were, 2003. "Fertilizer trade and pricing in Uganda," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 42(4), pages 1-15, December.
    5. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
    6. Tavneet Suri, 2011. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 159-209, January.
    7. Diiro, Gracious M. & Ker, Alan P. & San, Abdul G., 2015. "The role of gender in fertiliser adoption in Uganda," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(2), pages 1-14.
    8. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 35-69, March.
    9. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, September.
    10. Takashi Yamano & Keijiro Otsuka & Frank Place (ed.), 2011. "Emerging Development of Agriculture in East Africa," Springer Books, Springer, number 978-94-007-1201-0, February.
    11. Munshi, Kaivan, 2004. "Social learning in a heterogeneous population: technology diffusion in the Indian Green Revolution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 185-213, February.
    12. Christine M. Moser & Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "The complex dynamics of smallholder technology adoption: the case of SRI in Madagascar," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 373-388, November.
    13. Fisher, Monica & Kandiwa, Vongai, 2014. "Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 101-111.
    14. Andre Croppenstedt & Mulat Demeke & Meloria M. Meschi, 2003. "Technology Adoption in the Presence of Constraints: the Case of Fertilizer Demand in Ethiopia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(1), pages 58-70, February.
    15. Thapa, Sridhar, 2008. "Gender differentials in agricultural productivity: evidence from Nepalese household data," MPRA Paper 13722, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2009.
    16. Jean M. Due & Christina H. Gladwin, 1991. "Impacts of Structural Adjustment Programs on African Women Farmers and Female-Headed Households," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 73(5), pages 1431-1439.
    17. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    18. Besley, Timothy & Case, Anne, 1993. "Modeling Technology Adoption in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 396-402, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Khushbu Mishra & Abdoul G. Sam & Gracious M. Diiro & Mario J. Miranda, 2020. "Gender and the dynamics of technology adoption: Empirical evidence from a household‐level panel data," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 51(6), pages 857-870, November.
    2. Ayalew, Hailemariam & Chamberlin, Jordan & Newman, Carol, 2022. "Site-specific agronomic information and technology adoption: A field experiment from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C).
    3. Zhu, Jessica, 2018. "Understanding the Rationale of Heterogeneous Farmers' Agricultural Technology Adoption Decisions," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274233, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Abay, Kibrom A. & Berhane, Guush & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum & Koru, Bethlehem & Abay, Kibrewossen, 2016. "Understanding farmers’ technology adoption decisions: Input complementarity and heterogeneity:," ESSP working papers 82, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Dominik Naeher, 2022. "Technology Adoption Under Costly Information Processing," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 63(2), pages 699-753, May.
    6. Terrance Hurley & Jawoo Koo & Kindie Tesfaye, 2018. "Weather risk: how does it change the yield benefits of nitrogen fertilizer and improved maize varieties in sub‐Saharan Africa?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 49(6), pages 711-723, November.
    7. Michelson, Hope & Fairbairn, Anna & Ellison, Brenna & Maertens, Annemie & Manyong, Victor, 2021. "Misperceived quality: Fertilizer in Tanzania," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C).
    8. Josephson, Anna & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2020. "Preferences and crop choice during Zimbabwe’s macroeconomic crisis," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 15(3), September.
    9. Matsumoto, Tomoya, 2014. "Disseminating new farming practices among small scale farmers: An experimental intervention in Uganda," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 43-74.
    10. Bonjean, Isabelle & Platteau, Jean-Philippe & Verardi, Vincenzo, 2017. "Innovation Adoption and Liquidity Constraints in the Presence of Grassroots Extension Agents: Evidence from the Peruvian Highlands," CEPR Discussion Papers 12263, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Estelle Koussoubé & Céline Nauges, 2017. "Returns to fertiliser use: Does it pay enough? Some new evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 44(2), pages 183-210.
    12. Bonjean, Isabelle, 2019. "Heterogeneous incentives for innovation adoption: The price effect on segmented markets," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 1-1.
    13. Anna Folke Larsen, 2015. "The network at work: Diffusion of banana cultivation in Tanzania," CAM Working Papers camwp2015_01, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
    14. Adong, Annet & Tinker, James & Levine, David & Mbowa, Swaibu & Odokonyero, Tony, 2020. "Encouraging fertilizer adoption through risk free sales offer: A randomized control trial in Uganda," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 19(C).
    15. B Kelsey Jack, "undated". "Market Inefficiencies and the Adoption of Agricultural Technologies in Developing Countries," CID Working Papers 50, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    16. Rema Hanna & Sendhi Mullainathan & Josh Schwartstein, 2012. "Learning Through Noticing: Theory and Experimental Evidence in Farming," CID Working Papers 245, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    17. Kondylis, Florence & Mueller, Valerie, 2012. "Seeing is Believing? Evidence from a Demonstration Plot Experiment in Mozambique:," MSSP working papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    18. Gobillon, Laurent & Wolff, François-Charles, 2020. "The local effects of an innovation: Evidence from the French fish market," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 171(C).
    19. Surya Bhushan, 2021. "Labour Productivity Dynamics in Indian Agriculture: 2000–2016," The Indian Journal of Labour Economics, Springer;The Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE), vol. 64(2), pages 371-388, June.
    20. Channa, Hira & Chen, Amy Z. & Pina, Patricia & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Stein, Daniel, 2019. "What drives smallholder farmers’ willingness to pay for a new farm technology? Evidence from an experimental auction in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 64-71.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty; International Development; Risk and Uncertainty;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea15:206550. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: AgEcon Search (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.