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Determinants of Child Malnutrition in Tanzania: a Quantile Regression Approach

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  • Shiratori, Sakiko

Abstract

Reducing child malnutrition is one of the most important development goals. This study adopts a quantile regression approach to estimate the socioeconomic determinants of a child’s nutritional status and to explore for whom policy intervention matter the most. Using the data of children under five in Tanzania, the effects of several variables on child’s height-for-age z-score (HAZ) and hemoglobin level are examined. HAZ is influenced by age, sex, preceding birth interval, mother’s height and body-mass-index (BMI), and wealth, among others. The results from quantile regressions suggest that the intervention to improve mother’s education, especially higher than primary school, is effective to reduce the child’s malnutrition at the lower end of distribution. The interventions to upgrade drinking water or toilet facilities may not be sufficient in raising malnourished child’s nutritional status. Hemoglobin level is influenced by age, sex, mother’s hemoglobin level, parental education, and household size, among others. Conditional distributions make little difference with regard to hemoglobin level. Since common interventions of deworming or sleeping under the net are not significant, other interventions such as nutritional ones might be more effective for reducing anemia. 3 Large effects of mother’s nutritional status on child’s nutritional status imply that malnutrition is handed down from one generation to another, which could keep children trapped in the cycle of poverty. It would be effective to carefully integrate applicable interventions according to the objective and target population in order for wellbeing of individuals and for the development of the country.

Suggested Citation

  • Shiratori, Sakiko, 2014. "Determinants of Child Malnutrition in Tanzania: a Quantile Regression Approach," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170304, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea14:170304
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.170304
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/170304/files/AAEA%20shiratori%202014-5-28.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Koenker, Roger W & Bassett, Gilbert, Jr, 1978. "Regression Quantiles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 33-50, January.
    2. Alderman, Harold & Hoogeveen, Hans & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2006. "Reducing child malnutrition in Tanzania: Combined effects of income growth and program interventions," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 1-23, January.
    3. Mark McGillivray & Indranil Dutta & Nora Markova, 2009. "Health inequality and deprivation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S1), pages 1-12, April.
    4. Morales, Rolando & Aguilar, Ana Maria & Calzadilla, Alvaro, 2004. "Geography and culture matter for malnutrition in Bolivia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 373-390, December.
    5. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Adam Wagstaff & Magnus Lindelow, 2008. "Analyzing Health Equity Using Household Survey Data : A Guide to Techniques and Their Implementation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6896.
    6. Lawrence Haddad & Harold Alderman & Simon Appleton & Lina Song & Yisehac Yohannes, 2003. "Reducing Child Malnutrition: How Far Does Income Growth Take Us?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(1), pages 107-131, June.
    7. Burchi, Francesco, 2010. "Child nutrition in Mozambique in 2003: The role of mother's schooling and nutrition knowledge," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 331-345, December.
    8. Aturupane, Harsha & Deolalikar, Anil B. & Gunewardena, Dileni, 2008. "The Determinants of Child Weight and Height in Sri Lanka: A Quantile Regression Approach," WIDER Working Paper Series 053, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Sahn, David E. & Alderman, Harold, 1997. "On the determinants of nutrition in Mozambique: The importance of age-specific effects," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 577-588, January.
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    Keywords

    Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; International Development;

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