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A Spatial Analysis of the Role of Residential Real Estate Investment in the Economic Development of the Northeast Region of the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Jayaraman, Praveena
  • Lacombe, Donald J.
  • Gebremedhin, Tesfa

Abstract

Spatial dependence is an important factor in regional economic growth analysis, especially in terms of population, employment, and per capita income. This paper employs spatial econometric techniques and U.S. Census Bureau county-level data for the period of 1980-2010 to identify and estimate the impacts of residential real estate investment on the economic development of the Northeast region. A spatial panel method is used to analyze the spillover effect of county level economic development on neighboring counties

Suggested Citation

  • Jayaraman, Praveena & Lacombe, Donald J. & Gebremedhin, Tesfa, 2013. "A Spatial Analysis of the Role of Residential Real Estate Investment in the Economic Development of the Northeast Region of the United States," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150953, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150953
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/150953
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Residential Real Estate Investments; Spatial Econometrics; Spatial Panel; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Public Economics; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

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