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Do Natural Disasters Affect Trust/Trustworthiness? Evidence from the 2010 Chilean Earthquake

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  • Fleming, David A.
  • Chong, Alberto E.
  • Bejarano, Hernan D.

Abstract

A series of trust games were conducted in Chile to analyze whether the past 2010 earthquake affected trust and trustworthiness in rural communities. Results show that trust levels are invariant between villages affected by the earthquake and villages not affected by this shock (control group). However, we find statistical evidence that trustworthiness has diminished in areas affected by the earthquake. Results are relevant for policy regarding aid and recovery of communities affected by these types of disasters.

Suggested Citation

  • Fleming, David A. & Chong, Alberto E. & Bejarano, Hernan D., 2011. "Do Natural Disasters Affect Trust/Trustworthiness? Evidence from the 2010 Chilean Earthquake," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 104522, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea11:104522
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/104522
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Johnson, Noel D. & Mislin, Alexandra A., 2011. "Trust games: A meta-analysis," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 865-889.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Confuting one’s priors: the adversity and solidarity edition
      by Nicholas Gruen in Club Troppo on 2011-06-07 10:23:47

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    Cited by:

    1. Becchetti, Leonardo & Castriota, Stefano & Conzo, Pierluigi, 2017. "Disaster, Aid, and Preferences: The Long-run Impact of the Tsunami on Giving in Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 157-173.
    2. Pierluigi Conzo, 2014. "Trust and Cheating in Sri Lanka: The Role of Experimentally-Induced Emotions about Tsunam," CSEF Working Papers 355, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 20 Apr 2015.
    3. Ginger Turner & Farah Said & Uzma Afzal, 2014. "Microinsurance Demand After a Rare Flood Event: Evidence From a Field Experiment in Pakistan," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 39(2), pages 201-223, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trust games; natural disasters; trustworthiness; Community/Rural/Urban Development; International Development; C93; O13;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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