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The Impact of Agricultural Policy Distortions on the Productivity Gap: Evidence from the Rice Production


  • Rakotoarisoa, Manitra A.


This study determines how production and trade policy distortions affected rice productivity in thirty-three rice-producing countries. A rice-productivity index for each country is constructed, and a model linking the productivity gap with policy distortions is presented. After controlling for the differences in infrastructure, openness, and human capital, this article shows that high subsidies and protection in developed countries combined with taxation of rice farming in poor countries have widened the gap in rice productivity between rich and poor rice countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Rakotoarisoa, Manitra A., 2008. "The Impact of Agricultural Policy Distortions on the Productivity Gap: Evidence from the Rice Production," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6154, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea08:6154

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    More about this item


    agricultural policy distortions; trade policies; productivity; rice; Agricultural and Food Policy; Crop Production/Industries; International Relations/Trade; Productivity Analysis;

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