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Disaggregate Productivity Growth in Livestock Production: A Directional Malmquist Index Approach

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  • Ludena, Carlos E.
  • Hertel, Thomas W.
  • Preckel, Paul V.
  • Foster, Kenneth A.
  • Nin Pratt, Alejandro

Abstract

Limited data on the allocation of inputs to different activities has limited agricultural economists' attempts to measure sub-sector productivity growth in agriculture. However, recent developments have enabled us to estimate total factor productivity (TFP) growth for crops and livestock accounting for input-output allocation. This paper extends previous work on TFP measurement for livestock into ruminants and non-ruminant productivity measurement, given the differences in productivity growth rates among these species. The results show that the non-ruminant sector is more dynamic than the ruminant sector, driving most of the productivity growth within the livestock sector. Given the rapid rates of productivity growth observed recently, non-ruminant productivity in developing countries may soon be converging to the productivity levels of developed countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Ludena, Carlos E. & Hertel, Thomas W. & Preckel, Paul V. & Foster, Kenneth A. & Nin Pratt, Alejandro, 2005. "Disaggregate Productivity Growth in Livestock Production: A Directional Malmquist Index Approach," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19395, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea05:19395
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/19395
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dakpo, K & Jeanneaux, Philippe & Latruffee, Laure, 2015. "Empirical comparison of pollution generating technologies in nonparametric modelling: The case of greenhouse gas emissions in French sheep meat farming," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211557, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. K Hervé Dakpo & Philippe Jeanneaux & Laure Latruffe, 2014. "Inclusion of undesirable outputs in production technology modeling:The case of greenhouse gas emissions in French meat sheep farming," Working Papers SMART - LERECO 14-08, INRA UMR SMART-LERECO.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    total factor productivity; Malmquist index; livestock; ruminants; non-ruminants; Productivity Analysis; O47; O57; Q16;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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