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Nonpoint Source And Carbon Sequestration Credit Trading: What Can The Two Learn From Each Other?

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  • Stephenson, Kurt
  • Bosch, Darrell J.

Abstract

Emission trading programs have been discussed with respect to achieving water quality objectives and future caps on carbon emissions. A significant part of this literature explores the institutional and technical design issues associated with trades involving nonpoint effluent sources and carbon sequestration. This paper explores conceptual linkages between the nonpoint and carbon sequestration programs and identifies potential areas where cross fertilization can benefit research and policy design of trading programs for environmental protection.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephenson, Kurt & Bosch, Darrell J., 2003. "Nonpoint Source And Carbon Sequestration Credit Trading: What Can The Two Learn From Each Other?," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22229, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22229
    as

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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/22229/files/sp03st02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sergey V. Paltsev, 2001. "The Kyoto Protocol: Regional and Sectoral Contributions to the Carbon Leakage," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 53-80.
    2. Brian C. Murray & Bruce A. McCarl & Heng-Chi Lee, 2004. "Estimating Leakage from Forest Carbon Sequestration Programs," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 80(1), pages 109-124.
    3. Arun S. Malik & David Letson & Stephen R. Crutchfield, 1993. "Point/Nonpoint Source Trading of Pollution Abatement: Choosing the Right Trading Ratio," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 75(4), pages 959-967.
    4. Richard T. Woodward, 2003. "Lessons about Effluent Trading from a Single Trade," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(1), pages 235-245.
    5. Randall, Alan & Taylor, Michael A., 2000. "Incentive-Based Solutions To Agricultural Environmental Problems: Recent Developments In Theory And Practice," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-14, August.
    6. Leonard Shabman & Kurt Stephenson & William Shobe, 2002. "Trading Programs for Environmental Management: Reflections on the Air and Water Experiences," Working Papers 2002-01, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
    7. Shortle, James S & Horan, Richard D, 2001. " The Economics of Nonprofit Pollution Control," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 255-289, July.
    8. Randall, Alan & Taylor, Michael A., 2000. "Incentive-Based Solutions to Agricultural Environmental Problems: Recent Developments in Theory and Practice," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(02), pages 221-234, August.
    9. Darrell J. Bosch & James W. Pease, 2000. "Economic Risk and Water Quality Protection in Agriculture," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 22(2), pages 438-463.
    10. Ribaudo, Marc & Horan, Richard D. & Smith, Mark E., 1999. "Economics of Water Quality Protection from Nonpoint Sources: Theory and Practice," Agricultural Economics Reports 33913, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    11. Boyd, James, 2000. "The New Face of the Clean Water Act: A Critical Review of the EPA's Proposed TMDL Rules," Discussion Papers dp-00-12, Resources For the Future.
    12. Kurt Stephenson & Patricia Norris & Leonard Shabman, 1998. "Watershed-Based Effluent Trading: The Nonpoint Source Challenge," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(4), pages 412-421, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. McDonald, Hugh J. & Kennedy, Marianna & Ngawhika, Simon & Kerr, Suzi, 2010. "Trading efficiency in water quality markets," 2010 Conference, August 26-27, 2010, Nelson, New Zealand 96949, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. Hugh McDonald & Suzi Kerr, 2011. "Trading Efficiency in Water Quality Trading Markets: An Assessment of Trade-Offs," Working Papers 11_15, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

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