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Nonpoint Source And Carbon Sequestration Credit Trading: What Can The Two Learn From Each Other?

  • Stephenson, Kurt
  • Bosch, Darrell J.

Emission trading programs have been discussed with respect to achieving water quality objectives and future caps on carbon emissions. A significant part of this literature explores the institutional and technical design issues associated with trades involving nonpoint effluent sources and carbon sequestration. This paper explores conceptual linkages between the nonpoint and carbon sequestration programs and identifies potential areas where cross fertilization can benefit research and policy design of trading programs for environmental protection.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/22229
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Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada with number 22229.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22229
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  1. Richard T. Woodward, 2003. "Lessons about Effluent Trading from a Single Trade," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(1), pages 235-245.
  2. Kurt Stephenson & Patricia Norris & Leonard Shabman, 1998. "Watershed-Based Effluent Trading: The Nonpoint Source Challenge," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(4), pages 412-421, October.
  3. Sergey V. Paltsev, 2001. "The Kyoto Protocol: Regional and Sectoral Contributions to the Carbon Leakage," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 53-80.
  4. Shortle, James S & Horan, Richard D, 2001. " The Economics of Nonprofit Pollution Control," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 255-89, July.
  5. Randall, Alan & Taylor, Michael A., 2000. "Incentive-Based Solutions To Agricultural Environmental Problems: Recent Developments In Theory And Practice," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(02), August.
  6. Leonard Shabman & Kurt Stephenson & William Shobe, 2002. "Trading Programs for Environmental Management: Reflections on the Air and Water Experiences," Working Papers 2002-01, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
  7. Boyd, James, 2000. "The New Face of the Clean Water Act: A Critical Review of the EPA's Proposed TMDL Rules," Discussion Papers dp-00-12, Resources For the Future.
  8. Brian C. Murray & Bruce A. McCarl & Heng-Chi Lee, 2004. "Estimating Leakage from Forest Carbon Sequestration Programs," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20043, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2003.
  9. Ribaudo, Marc & Horan, Richard D. & Smith, Mark E., 1999. "Economics of Water Quality Protection from Nonpoint Sources: Theory and Practice," Agricultural Economics Reports 33913, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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