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The influence of household farming systems on dietary diversity and caloric intake: the case of Uganda

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  • Linderhof, Vincent
  • Powell, Jeffrey
  • Vignes, Romain
  • Ruben, Ruerd

Abstract

The relationship between farm production diversity at the plot level and diversity of household consumption and caloric intake are econometrically estimated. Our results confirm previous findings that an increase in production diversity increases consumption diversity and thereby, presumably, household nutritional levels. In addition, we find a positive relationship between diversity of farm production and caloric intake. Three waves of the World Bank LSMS-ISA database for Uganda were used to create a panel data set. Fixed effects models were estimated. Preliminary results indicate that households that produce a greater diversity of crops, have higher food expenditures, have larger farms, and consume more from their own production have higher nutrition diversity and caloric intake. Policy implications are that strategies aimed at increasing household production diversity may have positive effects on household nutritional levels and caloric intake.

Suggested Citation

  • Linderhof, Vincent & Powell, Jeffrey & Vignes, Romain & Ruben, Ruerd, 2016. "The influence of household farming systems on dietary diversity and caloric intake: the case of Uganda," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246444, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaae16:246444
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    Keywords

    dietary diversity; panel data; farm production diversity; caloric intakes; Uganda; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Production Economics;

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