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Traceability in the Canadian Red Meat Sector

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  • Hobbs, Jill E.

Abstract

The agri-food chain today is significantly different from that of twenty years ago. Changing consumer demands, knowledge intensive technology, North American integration and globalization have all contributed to the evolution of the different segments of the chain, which include input suppliers, agricultural producers, food processors, and food distributors. The purpose of the performance report series is to create a picture of the economic health of the entire agri-food chain and its various segments, and to identify the challenges and opportunities that they will face in the future. To get a full picture of each component's and the whole chain's economic health, these reports will measure economic performance from several different perspectives; profitability, competitiveness, investment, productivity, innovativeness, etc. Traceability systems can vary from simple traceback systems to systems that provide identity preservation and quality assurance. This report reviews the different red meat traceability systems that are in place around the world, and explores the question: 'What kind of a traceability system do Canadian consumers want in the red meat sector?' The authors use experimental auctions of beef and ham sandwiches to estimate consumers' willingness to pay for simple traceback systems, traceback systems that provide assurances of superior food safety production standards and traceback systems that provide assurances of humane animal treatment.

Suggested Citation

  • Hobbs, Jill E., 2004. "Traceability in the Canadian Red Meat Sector," Economic and Market Information 55304, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaacem:55304
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/55304
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shogren, Jason F. & Seung Y. Shin & Dermot J. Hayes & James B. Kliebenstein, 1994. "Resolving Differences in Willingness to Pay and Willingness to Accept," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 255-270, March.
    2. Kathleen Segerson, 1999. "Mandatory versus voluntary approaches to food safety," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 53-70.
    3. Segerson, Kathleen, 1998. "Mandatory vs. Voluntary Approaches to Food Safety," Research Reports 25188, University of Connecticut, Food Marketing Policy Center.
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    Cited by:

    1. Banterle, Alessandro & Souza Monteiro, Diogo M. & Stranieri, Stefanella, 2009. "Does traceability play a role in retailer’s strategies for private labels?," 83rd Annual Conference, March 30-April 1, 2009, Dublin, Ireland 50933, Agricultural Economics Society.
    2. Sébastien Pouliot & Daniel A. Sumner, 2008. "Traceability, Liability, and Incentives for Food Safety and Quality," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(1), pages 15-27.
    3. Pouliot, Sebastien, 2010. "Welfare Effects of Mandatory Traceability When Firms are Heterogeneous," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61017, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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