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Working Paper 172 - Political Economy of Service Delivery: Monitoring versus Contestation

  • Kjell Hausken
  • Mthuli Ncube

    ()

Many communities suffer limited public goods provision due to civil servants (doctors, teachers, etc) supplementing their low income with moonlighting activities. Monitors of civil servants commonly also earn low salaries from monitoring and may prefer political contestation for power and prestige. We determine an internal equilibrium for how monitors strike a balance between monitoring and political contestation. We also determine a corner solution where an unresourceful monitor does not monitor. A variety of characteristics including the intensity of political contestation are accounted for. Survey data from Tanzania and Senegal are used to show the significance of poor service delivery within education and healthcare services.

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File URL: http://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Publications/Working%20Paper%20172%20-%20Political%20Economy%20of%20Service%20Delivery-%20Monitoring%20versus%20Contestation.pdf
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Paper provided by African Development Bank in its series Working Paper Series with number 468.

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Date of creation: 14 Jun 2013
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Handle: RePEc:adb:adbwps:468
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  1. Das, Jishnu & Hammer, Jeffrey, 2004. "Which doctor? Combining vignettes and item response to measure doctor quality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3301, The World Bank.
  2. Filmer, Deon & Pritchett, Lant, 1999. "The impact of public spending on health: does money matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(10), pages 1309-1323, November.
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  4. Eric A. Hanushek, 2003. "The Failure of Input-Based Schooling Policies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F64-F98, February.
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  7. Tan, Jee-Peng & Lane, Julia & Coustere, Paul, 1997. "Putting Inputs to Work in Elementary Schools: What Can Be Done in the Philippines?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(4), pages 857-79, July.
  8. Skaperdas, Stergios, 1996. "Contest Success Functions," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 283-90, February.
  9. Jishnu Das & Jeffrey Hammer & Kenneth Leonard, 2008. "The Quality of Medical Advice in Low-Income Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(2), pages 93-114, Spring.
  10. Golola, Moses L., 2001. "Decentralization, Local Bureaucracies and Service Delivery in Uganda," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  11. Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 1999. "School Inputs And Educational Outcomes In South Africa," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 1047-1084, August.
  12. Mæstad, Ottar & Torsvik, Gaute & Aakvik, Arild, 2010. "Overworked? On the relationship between workload and health worker performance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 686-698, September.
  13. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
  14. Martina Björkman & Jakob Svensson, 2009. "Power to the People: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment on Community-Based Monitoring in Uganda," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(2), pages 735-769, May.
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