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Working Conditions, Lifestyles and Health

  • Elena Cottini

    ()

    (Dondena Center for Research on Social Dynamics, Bocconi University and Center for Corporate Performance, Aarhus University)

  • Paolo Ghinetti

    (Dipartimento di Studi per l’Economia e l’Impresa, Università del Piemonte Orientale)

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether employee health is affected by the environment in which the individual works - in terms of both physical and psychosocial working conditions - and by his or her lifestyle. Health measures are computed from Danish data, and refer to both self assessed general health and two more objective health measures: mental health specific to work-related problems, and physical health. We find that both bad working conditions and bad lifestyles reduce health, especially in its self-assessed component. The impact of lifetsyle indicators have a more modest health impact on both physical and mental health.

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File URL: ftp://ftp.econ.au.dk/afn/wp/12/wp12_28.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus in its series Economics Working Papers with number 2012-28.

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Length: 40
Date of creation: 12 Nov 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2012-28
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.au.dk/afn/

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  8. Elena Cottini & Claudio Lucifora, 2009. "Health at Work and Low-pay:a European Perspective," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Economia dell'Impresa e del Lavoro ieil0056, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
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  11. Robone, S & Jones, A. M & Rice, N, 2008. "Contractual Conditions, Working conditions, Health and Well-Being in the British Household Panel Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/19, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  12. Böckerman, Petri & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2007. "Job disamenities, job satisfaction, quit intentions, and actual separations: putting the pieces together," MPRA Paper 3245, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Borg, Vilhelm & Kristensen, Tage S., 2000. "Social class and self-rated health: can the gradient be explained by differences in life style or work environment?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(7), pages 1019-1030, October.
  14. Sebastian Buhai & Miguel Portela & Coen N. Teulings & Aico van Vuuren, 2008. "Returns to Tenure or Seniority?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-010/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  15. Wilde, Joachim, 2000. "Identification of multiple equation probit models with endogenous dummy regressors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 309-312, December.
  16. Cottini, Elena & Lucifora, Claudio, 2010. "Mental Health and Working Conditions in European Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 4717, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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