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Who wants paternalism?

Author

Listed:
  • Sofie Kragh Pedersen
  • Alexander K. Koch

    ()

  • Julia Nafziger

    (Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University, Denmark)

Abstract

Abstract Little is known about the demand side of paternalism. We investigate attitudes towards paternalism among Danish students. The main question is whether demand for paternalism is related to self-control, either because people with self-control problems seek commitment devices to overcome these problems, or because people with good self-control want those who lack it to change their behaviors. We find no evidence linking self-control to attitudes towards weak forms of paternalism (e.g. nudges or information about health consequences). But respondents with good selfcontrol are significantly more favorable towards strong paternalism (e.g. restricting choices or sin taxes) than those struggling with self-control.

Suggested Citation

  • Sofie Kragh Pedersen & Alexander K. Koch & Julia Nafziger, 2012. "Who wants paternalism?," Economics Working Papers 2012-22, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  • Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2012-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Schnellenbach, 2016. "A Constitutional Economics Perspective on Soft Paternalism," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(1), pages 135-156, February.
    2. Lukasz Wozny & Michal Krawczyk, 2016. "An experiment on temptation and attitude towards paternalism," Working Papers 2016-018, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis.
    3. Christian Schubert, 2015. "On the ethics of public nudging: Autonomy and Agency," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201533, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Self-control; paternalism; commitment; political attitudes;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics

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