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Transitions between Employment and Nonemployment

In: The Black Youth Employment Crisis

Author

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  • John Ballen
  • Richard B. Freeman

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • John Ballen & Richard B. Freeman, 1986. "Transitions between Employment and Nonemployment," NBER Chapters, in: The Black Youth Employment Crisis, pages 75-114, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6283
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c6283.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard B. Freeman & David A. Wise, 1982. "The Youth Labor Market Problem: Its Nature Causes and Consequences," NBER Chapters, in: The Youth Labor Market Problem: Its Nature, Causes, and Consequences, pages 1-16, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David T. Ellwood, 1982. "Teenage Unemployment: Permanent Scars or Temporary Blemishes?," NBER Chapters, in: The Youth Labor Market Problem: Its Nature, Causes, and Consequences, pages 349-390, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Richard B. Freeman & James L. Medoff, 1982. "The Youth Labor Market Problem in the United States: An Overview," NBER Chapters, in: The Youth Labor Market Problem: Its Nature, Causes, and Consequences, pages 35-74, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 1981. "Race and Sex Differences in Quits by Young Workers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 34(4), pages 563-577, July.
    5. Freeman, Richard B. & Wise, David A. (ed.), 1982. "The Youth Labor Market Problem," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226261614, January.
    6. James M. Poterba & Lawrence H. Summers, 1983. "Survey Response Variation in the Current Population Survey," NBER Working Papers 1109, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Gary Chamberlain, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 225-238.
    8. Dennis J. Aigner & Glen G. Cain, 1977. "Statistical Theories of Discrimination in Labor Markets," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 30(2), pages 175-187, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. H. J. Holzer & R. J. LaLonde, "undated". "Job Change and Job Stability among Less-Skilled Young Workers," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1191-99, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    2. Holzer, Harry J, 1987. "Informal Job Search and Black Youth Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 446-452, June.
    3. Joseph G. Altonji & Thomas A. Dunn, 1991. "Relationships Among the Family Incomes and Labor Market Outcomes of Relatives," NBER Working Papers 3724, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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