IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/elg/eechap/14637_11.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

What’s gender got to do with the Great Recession? The Italian case

In: The Great Recession and the Contradictions of Contemporary Capitalism

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanna Vertova

Abstract

The current crisis is one of the great crises punctuating the long history of capitalism, and to be properly understood it is vital to take into account its ongoing structural transformation. This book offers plural perspectives on the Great Recession, placing the analysis of finance, class and gender at the center of the debate. It begins with a comprehensive insight into the crisis, before moving on to focus on debt, asset inflation and financial fragility. Following chapters discuss global imbalances, structural monetary reform and the management of public finance, including a investigation of the Italian experience. The book concludes with novel contributions on the gender dimension of the crisis and the analogies between a nuclear and financial chain reaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanna Vertova, 2014. "What’s gender got to do with the Great Recession? The Italian case," Chapters,in: The Great Recession and the Contradictions of Contemporary Capitalism, chapter 11, pages 189-207 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14637_11
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9780857938527.00016.xml
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jean-Paul Fitoussi & Joseph Stiglitz, 2009. "The Ways Out of the Crisis and the Builbing of a More Cohesive World," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2009-17, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    2. Jean-Paul Fitoussi & Joseph Stiglitz, 2009. "THE SHADOW GN*: The Ways Out of the Crisis and the Builbing of a More Cohesive World," Sciences Po publications 2009-17, Sciences Po.
    3. Pasinetti, Luigi L, 1998. "The Myth (or Folly) of the 3 Percent Deficit/GDP Maastricht 'Parameter.'," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 103-116, January.
    4. Standing, Guy, 1999. "Global Feminization Through Flexible Labor: A Theme Revisited," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 583-602, March.
    5. Riccardo Bellofiore, 2013. "'Two or three things I know about her': Europe in the global crisis and heterodox economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(3), pages 497-512.
    6. M. V. Lee BADGETT & Nancy FOLBRE, 1999. "Assigning care: Gender norms and economic outcomes," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 138(3), pages 311-326, September.
    7. Janice Peterson, 2012. "The Great Crisis and the Significance of Gender in the U.S. Economy," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 277-290.
    8. John B. Taylor, 2009. "The Financial Crisis and the Policy Responses: An Empirical Analysis of What Went Wrong," NBER Working Papers 14631, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Ben S. Bernanke, 2013. "The Federal Reserve and the Financial Crisis," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9928.
    10. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/5l6uh8ogmqildh09h469j4ua7 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2001. "Boys will be Boys: Gender, Overconfidence, and Common Stock Investment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 261-292.
    12. Himmelweit, Susan & Mohun, Simon, 1977. "Domestic Labour and Capital," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 15-31, March.
    13. Aldo Barba & Massimo Pivetti, 2009. "Rising household debt: Its causes and macroeconomic implications--a long-period analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 113-137, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14637_11. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darrel McCalla). General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.