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Adam Richardson

Personal Details

First Name:Adam
Middle Name:
Last Name:Richardson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pri410
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Reserve Bank of New Zealand

Wellington, New Zealand
http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/
RePEc:edi:rbngvnz (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Christopher Ball & Adam Richardson & Thomas van Florenstein Mulder, 2020. "Using job transitions data as a labour market indicator," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2020/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  2. Adam Richardson, 2019. "New Zealand Wage Inflation Post-crisis," RBA Annual Conference Papers acp2019-02, Reserve Bank of Australia, revised Jul 2019.
  3. Jamie Culling & Michael Callaghan & Adam Richardson, 2019. "Effective Monetary Stimulus: Measuring the stance of monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2019/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  4. Adam Richardson & Thomas van Florenstein Mulder & Tugrul Vehbi, 2018. "Nowcasting New Zealand GDP using machine learning algorithms," CAMA Working Papers 2018-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  5. Amber Wadsworth & Adam Richardson, 2017. "A factor model of commodity price co-movements: An application to New Zealand export prices," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2017/06, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  6. Adam Richardson, 2015. "Can global economic conditions explain low New Zealand inflation?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2015/03, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  7. Adam Richardson & Rebecca Williams, 2015. "Estimating New Zealand’s neutral interest rate," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2015/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  8. Adam Richardson, 2011. "The macroeconomic impact of the Rugby World Cup," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2011/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

Articles

  1. Richardson, Adam & van Florenstein Mulder, Thomas & Vehbi, Tuğrul, 2021. "Nowcasting GDP using machine-learning algorithms: A real-time assessment," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 941-948.
  2. Sarah Drought & Roger Perry & Adam Richardson, 2018. "Aspects of implementing unconventional monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 81, pages 1-22, May.
  3. Michelle Lewis & Dr John McDermott & Adam Richardson, 2016. "Inflation expectations and the conduct of monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-12, March.
  4. Adam Richardson, 2016. "Behind the scenes of an OCR decision in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-15, July.
  5. Dean Ford & Elizabeth Kendall & Adam Richardson, 2015. "Evaluating monetary policy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 78, pages 3-21, November.

Chapters

  1. Adam Richardson & Thomas van Florenstein Mulder & Tugrul Vehbi, 2019. "Nowcasting New Zealand GDP using machine learning algorithms," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The use of big data analytics and artificial intelligence in central banking, volume 50, Bank for International Settlements.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jamie Culling & Michael Callaghan & Adam Richardson, 2019. "Effective Monetary Stimulus: Measuring the stance of monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2019/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Callaghan & Enzo Cassino & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Opening the toolbox: how does the Reserve Bank analyse the world?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-14, April.
    2. Vijay Kumar & Sanjeev Acharya & Ly T. H. Ho, 2020. "Does Monetary Policy Influence the Profitability of Banks in New Zealand?," IJFS, MDPI, vol. 8(2), pages 1-17, June.

  2. Adam Richardson & Thomas van Florenstein Mulder & Tugrul Vehbi, 2018. "Nowcasting New Zealand GDP using machine learning algorithms," CAMA Working Papers 2018-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Marcelo C. Medeiros & Henrique F. Pires, 2021. "The Proper Use of Google Trends in Forecasting Models," Papers 2104.03065, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2021.
    2. Christopher Ball & Adam Richardson & Thomas van Florenstein Mulder, 2020. "Using job transitions data as a labour market indicator," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2020/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    3. Jaehyun Yoon, 2021. "Forecasting of Real GDP Growth Using Machine Learning Models: Gradient Boosting and Random Forest Approach," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 57(1), pages 247-265, January.
    4. Isaac K. Ofori, 2021. "Catching the Drivers of Inclusive Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Application of Machine Learning," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 21/044, African Governance and Development Institute..
    5. Tamara, Novian & Dwi Muchisha, Nadya & Andriansyah, Andriansyah & Soleh, Agus M, 2020. "Nowcasting Indonesia’s GDP Growth Using Machine Learning Algorithms," MPRA Paper 105235, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Daniel Hopp, 2022. "Benchmarking Econometric and Machine Learning Methodologies in Nowcasting," Papers 2205.03318, arXiv.org.
    7. Adam Richardson & Thomas van Florenstein Mulder & Tugrul Vehbi, 2019. "Nowcasting New Zealand GDP using machine learning algorithms," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The use of big data analytics and artificial intelligence in central banking, volume 50, Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Dennis Kant & Andreas Pick & Jasper de Winter, 2022. "Nowcasting GDP using machine learning methods," Working Papers 754, DNB.
    9. James Chapman & Ajit Desai, 2021. "Using Payments Data to Nowcast Macroeconomic Variables During the Onset of COVID-19," Staff Working Papers 21-2, Bank of Canada.
    10. Barış Soybilgen & Ege Yazgan, 2021. "Nowcasting US GDP Using Tree-Based Ensemble Models and Dynamic Factors," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 57(1), pages 387-417, January.
    11. Harris Ntantanis & Lawrence Pohlman, 2020. "Market implied GDP," Journal of Asset Management, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 21(7), pages 636-646, December.
    12. Brett Rayner & Marijn A. Bolhuis, 2020. "The More the Merrier? A Machine Learning Algorithm for Optimal Pooling of Panel Data," IMF Working Papers 2020/044, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Kristian Jönsson, 2020. "Machine Learning and Nowcasts of Swedish GDP," Journal of Business Cycle Research, Springer;Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys (CIRET), vol. 16(2), pages 123-134, November.
    14. Andrei Dubovik & Adam Elbourne & Bram Hendriks & Mark Kattenberg, 2022. "Forecasting World Trade Using Big Data and Machine Learning Techniques," CPB Discussion Paper 441, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    15. Nuttanan Wichitaksorn, 2020. "Analyzing and Forecasting Thai Macroeconomic Data using Mixed-Frequency Approach," PIER Discussion Papers 146, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research.
    16. Isaac K. Ofori & Camara K. Obeng & Simplice A. Asongu, 2022. "What Really Drives Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence from The Lasso Regularization and Inferential Techniques," Working Papers 22/061, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    17. Rossouw, Stephanie & Greyling, Talita, 2020. "Big Data and Happiness," GLO Discussion Paper Series 634, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    18. Sabyasachi Kar & Amaani Bashir & Mayank Jain, 2021. "New Approaches to Forecasting Growth and Inflation: Big Data and Machine Learning," IEG Working Papers 446, Institute of Economic Growth.
    19. Brett Rayner & Marijn A. Bolhuis, 2020. "Deus ex Machina? A Framework for Macro Forecasting with Machine Learning," IMF Working Papers 2020/045, International Monetary Fund.
    20. Byron Botha & Geordie Reid & Tim Olds & Daan Steenkamp & Rossouw van Jaarsveld, 2021. "Nowcasting South African GDP using a suite of statistical models," Working Papers 11001, South African Reserve Bank.
    21. Wichitaksorn, Nuttanan, 2022. "Analyzing and forecasting Thai macroeconomic data using mixed-frequency approach," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C).
    22. Byron Botha & Tim Olds & Geordie Reid & Daan Steenkamp & Rossouw van Jaarsveld, 2021. "Nowcasting South African gross domestic product using a suite of statistical models," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 89(4), pages 526-554, December.

  3. Amber Wadsworth & Adam Richardson, 2017. "A factor model of commodity price co-movements: An application to New Zealand export prices," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2017/06, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Esther Figueroa-Hernández & Francisco Pérez-Soto & Lucila Godínez-Montoya & Rebeca Alejandra Perez-Figueroa, 2019. "Los precios de café en la producción y las exportaciones a nivel mundial," Remef - Revista Mexicana de Economía y Finanzas Nueva Época REMEF (The Mexican Journal of Economics and Finance), Instituto Mexicano de Ejecutivos de Finanzas, IMEF, vol. 14(1), pages 41-56, Enero-Mar.

  4. Adam Richardson & Rebecca Williams, 2015. "Estimating New Zealand’s neutral interest rate," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2015/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Rebecca Williams, 2017. "Business cycle review: 2008 to present day," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, pages 1-22, March.
    2. Sarah Drought & Roger Perry & Adam Richardson, 2018. "Aspects of implementing unconventional monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 81, pages 1-22, May.
    3. Luis Ceballos & Jorge A. Fornero & Andrés Gatty, 2017. "Nuevas estimaciones de la tasa real neutral de Chile," Notas de Investigación Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 20(3), pages 120-143, December.
    4. Michelle Lewis & C. John McDermott, 2016. "New Zealand's experience with changing its inflation target and the impact on inflation expectations," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(3), pages 343-361, September.
    5. Carrillo Julio A. & Elizondo Rocío & Rodríguez-Pérez Cid Alonso & Roldán-Peña Jessica, 2018. "What Determines the Neutral Rate of Interest in an Emerging Economy?," Working Papers 2018-22, Banco de México.
    6. Adam Richardson, 2016. "Behind the scenes of an OCR decision in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-15, July.
    7. Nguyen, Luan, 2016. "Should the Reserve Bank worry about the exchange rate?," MPRA Paper 75519, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Richardson, Adam & van Florenstein Mulder, Thomas & Vehbi, Tuğrul, 2021. "Nowcasting GDP using machine-learning algorithms: A real-time assessment," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 941-948.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Sarah Drought & Roger Perry & Adam Richardson, 2018. "Aspects of implementing unconventional monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 81, pages 1-22, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Grahame Johnson & Sharon Kozicki & Romanos Priftis & Lena Suchanek & Jonathan Witmer & Jing Yang, 2020. "Implementation and Effectiveness of Extended Monetary Policy Tools: Lessons from the Literature," Discussion Papers 2020-16, Bank of Canada.
    2. Buckle, Robert A., 2018. "Thirty years of inflation targeting in New Zealand: The origins, evolution and influence of a monetary policy innovation," Working Paper Series 8086, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    3. Central Bank of Malaysia, 2022. "Monetary and fiscal policy interactions in the wake of the pandemic," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The monetary-fiscal policy nexus in the wake of the pandemic, volume 122, pages 187-194, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Vijay Kumar & Sanjeev Acharya & Ly T. H. Ho, 2020. "Does Monetary Policy Influence the Profitability of Banks in New Zealand?," IJFS, MDPI, vol. 8(2), pages 1-17, June.
    5. Amber Wadsworth, 2018. "The pros and cons of issuing a central bank digital currency," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 81, pages 1-21, June.

  3. Michelle Lewis & Dr John McDermott & Adam Richardson, 2016. "Inflation expectations and the conduct of monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-12, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Julia Ratcliffe & Ross Kendall, 2019. "Monetary policy strategy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-25, April.
    2. Baumann, Ursel & Darracq Pariès, Matthieu & Westermann, Thomas & Riggi, Marianna & Bobeica, Elena & Meyler, Aidan & Böninghausen, Benjamin & Fritzer, Friedrich & Trezzi, Riccardo & Jonckheere, Jana & , 2021. "Inflation expectations and their role in Eurosystem forecasting," Occasional Paper Series 264, European Central Bank.
    3. Adam Richardson, 2016. "Behind the scenes of an OCR decision in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-15, July.

  4. Dean Ford & Elizabeth Kendall & Adam Richardson, 2015. "Evaluating monetary policy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 78, pages 3-21, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Julia Ratcliffe & Ross Kendall, 2019. "Monetary policy strategy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-25, April.
    2. Michelle Lewis, 2016. "Inflation expectations curve: a tool for monitoring inflation expectations," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2016/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    3. Amber Wadsworth, 2017. "An international comparison of inflation-targeting frameworks," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, pages 1-34, August.
    4. Amber Wadsworth, 0. "An international comparison of inflation-targeting frameworks," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80.
    5. Adam Richardson, 2016. "Behind the scenes of an OCR decision in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-15, July.
    6. John McDermott & Rebecca Williams, 2018. "Inflation Targeting in New Zealand: An Experience in Evolution," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: John Simon & Maxwell Sutton (ed.),Central Bank Frameworks: Evolution or Revolution?, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    7. Chris Hunt, 2017. "Independence with accountability: financial system regulation and the Reserve Bank," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, December.

Chapters

  1. Adam Richardson & Thomas van Florenstein Mulder & Tugrul Vehbi, 2019. "Nowcasting New Zealand GDP using machine learning algorithms," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The use of big data analytics and artificial intelligence in central banking, volume 50, Bank for International Settlements.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (3) 2015-08-07 2015-11-01 2019-04-15
  2. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (2) 2015-08-07 2019-04-15
  3. NEP-BIG: Big Data (1) 2018-10-08
  4. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2018-10-08
  5. NEP-FOR: Forecasting (1) 2018-10-08
  6. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2017-11-19
  7. NEP-SPO: Sports & Economics (1) 2011-08-29
  8. NEP-TUR: Tourism Economics (1) 2011-08-29

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