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Andrew Kerr

Personal Details

First Name:Andrew
Middle Name:
Last Name:Kerr
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pke228
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit (SALDRU)
School of Economics
Faculty of Commerce
University of Cape Town

Cape Town, South Africa
http://www.saldru.uct.ac.za/

+27 21 650 5696
+27 21 650 5697
Private BagX3, Rondebosch, 7701, Cape Town
RePEc:edi:sauctza (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Takwanisa Machemedze & Andrew Kerr & Rob Dorrington, 2020. "South African population projection and household survey sample weight recalibration," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-67, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Andrew Kerr, 2020. "Earnings in the South African Revenue Service IRP5 data," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-62, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  3. Andrew Keer & Bruce McDougall, 2020. "What is a firm census in a developing country? An answer from Ghana," CSAE Working Paper Series 2020-11, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Lauren Antrobus & Andrew Kerr, 2019. "The labour market for minibus taxi drivers in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 250, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  5. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2019. "Earnings and employment microdata in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-47, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  6. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2017. "Public sector wages and employment in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 214, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  7. Andrew Kerr & Patrizio Piraino & Vimal Ranchhod, 2016. "Estimating the size and impact of Affirmative Action at the University of Cape Town," SALDRU Working Papers 172, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  8. Andrew Kerr, 2016. "Job flows, worker flows, and churning in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-37, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  9. Elwyn Davies & Andrew Kerr, 2015. "Firm Survival and Change in Ghana, 2003-2013," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-06, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  10. Andrew Kerr, 2015. "Tax(i)ing the poor? Commuting costs in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 156, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  11. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg & Jairo Arrow, 2013. "Job Creation and Destruction in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 092, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  12. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2013. "Sampling methodology and field work changes in the october household surveys and labour force surveys," SALDRU Working Papers 101, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  13. Andrew Kerr, 2012. "A Model of Comparative Advantage with Matching in the Urban Tanzanian Labour Market," CSAE Working Paper Series 2012-21, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  14. Andrew Kerr & Francis Teal, 2012. "The Determinants of Earnings Inequalities: Panel data evidence from South Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2012-04, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  15. Paolo Falco & Andrew Kerr & Neil Rankin & Justin Sandefur & Francis Teal, 2010. "The Returns to formality and Informality in Urban Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

Articles

  1. Elwyn Davies & Andrew Kerr, 2018. "Firm Survival and Change in Ghana, 2003–2013," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 27(2), pages 149-171.
  2. Andrew Kerr, 2018. "Job Flows, Worker Flows and Churning in South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 86(S1), pages 141-166, January.
  3. Andrew Kerr, 2017. "Tax(i)ing the Poor? Commuting Costs in South African Cities," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(3), pages 321-340, September.
  4. Andrew Kerr & Patrizio Piraino & Vimal Ranchhod, 2017. "Estimating the Size and Impact of Affirmative Action in Undergraduate Admissions at the University of Cape Town," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(4), pages 515-532, December.
  5. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2015. "Sampling methodology and fieldwork changes in the October Household Surveys and Labour Force Surveys," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5), pages 603-612, September.
  6. Andrew Kerr & Francis Teal, 2015. "The Determinants of Earnings Inequalities: Panel Data Evidence from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 24(4), pages 530-558.
  7. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg & Jairo Arrow, 2014. "Job Creation and Destruction in South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(1), pages 1-18, March.
  8. Andrew Kerr, 2014. "Urban Labor Markets in Sub-Saharan Africa edited by Philippe De Vreyer and Franços Roubaud , Washington, DC : World Bank , 2013 , xxxii + 428 pp," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(4), pages 383-386, December.
  9. Falco, Paolo & Kerr, Andrew & Rankin, Neil & Sandefur, Justin & Teal, Francis, 2011. "The returns to formality and informality in urban Africa," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages 23-31.

Books

  1. Paolo Falco & Andrew Kerr & Pierella Paci & Bob Rijkers, 2014. "Working toward Better Pay : Earning Dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 18553, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2019. "Earnings and employment microdata in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-47, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Cited by:

    1. Jacqueline Mosomi & Mrtin Wittenberg, 2020. "The labor market in South Africa, 2000–2017," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 475-475, April.

  2. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2017. "Public sector wages and employment in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 214, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Haroon Bhorat & Safia Khan, 2018. "Structural Change and Patterns of Inequality in the South African Labour Market," Working Papers 201801, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    2. Jacqueline Mosomi, 2019. "Distributional changes in the gender wage gap in the post-apartheid South African labour market," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-17, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2019. "Earnings and employment microdata in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-47, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Andrew Kerr, 2020. "Earnings in the South African Revenue Service IRP5 data," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-62, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  3. Andrew Kerr, 2016. "Job flows, worker flows, and churning in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-37, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Cited by:

    1. Amina Ebrahim & Chris Axelson, 2019. "The creation of an individual panel using administrative tax microdata in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-27, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Robert Hill & Kezia Lilenstein & Amy Thornton, 2020. "Job spells in an emerging market: Evidence from apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-27, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2019. "Earnings and employment microdata in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-47, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Ihsaan Bassier, 2019. "The wage-setting power of firms: Rent-sharing and monopsony in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-34, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Marlies Piek & Dieter von Fintel & Johann Kirsten, 2020. "Separating employment effects into job destruction and job creation: Evidence from a large minimum wage increase in the agricultural sector using administrative tax data," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-51, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Amina Ebrahim & Kezia Lilenstein, 2019. "Gender and the South African labour market: Policy relevant research possibilities using South African tax data," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-31, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Mattie Susan Landman & Neave O'Clery, 2020. "The impact of the Employment Equity Act on female inter-industry labour mobility and the gender wage gap in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-52, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Andrew Kerr, 2020. "Earnings in the South African Revenue Service IRP5 data," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-62, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  4. Elwyn Davies & Andrew Kerr, 2015. "Firm Survival and Change in Ghana, 2003-2013," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-06, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. McKenzie, David J. & Paffhausen, Anna Luisa, 2017. "Small Firm Death in Developing Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 12401, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Andam, K. & Asante, S., 2018. "Determinants of firm exit and growth in the food processing sector: Evidence from Ghana," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277487, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Andam, Kwaw S. & Asante, Seth, 2018. "Firm employment, exit, and growth in the food processing sector: Evidence from Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1755, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

  5. Andrew Kerr, 2015. "Tax(i)ing the poor? Commuting costs in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 156, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Tiaan MEIRING, 2018. "The Gap Between Rich and Poor: South African Society’s Biggest Divide Depends on Where You Think You Fit In," Working Paper ffd19ae8-4b12-4b82-b218-8, Agence française de développement.
    2. Picarelli, Nathalie, 2019. "There Is No Free House," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 35-52.
    3. Martin Abel, 2017. "Labor market discrimination and sorting: Evidence from South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 205, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

  6. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg & Jairo Arrow, 2013. "Job Creation and Destruction in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 092, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Isaacs, Gilad, 2014. "The myth of “neutrality” and the rhetoric of “stability”: macroeconomic policy in democratic South Africa," MPRA Paper 54426, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Thomas Habanabakize & Daniel Francois Meyer & Judit Oláh, 2019. "The Impact of Productivity, Investment and Real Wages on Employment Absorption Rate in South Africa," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-15, December.
    3. Marlies Piek & Dieter von Fintel, 2020. "Sectoral minimum wages in South Africa: Disemployment by firm size and trade exposure," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 462-482, May.
    4. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2019. "Earnings and employment microdata in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-47, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Florian Leon & Samuel Monteiro, 2019. "Financial constraints, factor combination and Gibrat's law in Africa," Working Papers hal-02493343, HAL.
    6. Amina Ebrahim & Kezia Lilenstein, 2019. "Gender and the South African labour market: Policy relevant research possibilities using South African tax data," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-31, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Vincent Dadam and Nicola Viegi, 2015. "Labour Market and Monetary Policy in South Africa," Working Papers 551, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    8. Andrew Kerr, 2018. "Job Flows, Worker Flows and Churning in South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 86(S1), pages 141-166, January.
    9. Mattie Susan Landman & Neave O'Clery, 2020. "The impact of the Employment Equity Act on female inter-industry labour mobility and the gender wage gap in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-52, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    10. Félix, Elisabete Gomes Santana & Belo, Teresa Freitas, 2019. "The impact of microcredit on poverty reduction in eleven developing countries in south-east Asia," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 52.
    11. Thomas Habanabakize & Paul-Francois Muzindutsi, 2017. "Analysis of Government Expenditure and Sectoral Employment in the Post-apartheid South Africa: Application of ARDL Model," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 9(2), pages 224-233.
    12. Jacomien van der Merwe & Stephan Krygsman, 2020. "The relationship between transport accessibility and employment duration," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-56, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Rahul Anand & Siddharth Kothari & Naresh Kumar, 2016. "South Africa; Labor Market Dynamics and Inequality," IMF Working Papers 16/137, International Monetary Fund.

  7. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2013. "Sampling methodology and field work changes in the october household surveys and labour force surveys," SALDRU Working Papers 101, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Wittenberg, 2017. "Wages and Wage Inequality in South Africa 1994–2011: Part 2 – Inequality Measurement and Trends," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(2), pages 298-318, June.
    2. Martin Wittenberg & Mark Collinson & Tom Harris, 2017. "Decomposing changes in household measures: Household size and services in South Africa, 1994–2012," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(39), pages 1297-1326.
    3. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2019. "Earnings and employment microdata in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-47, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Martin Wittenberg, 2014. "Wages and wage inequality in South Africa 1994-2011: The evidence from household survey data," SALDRU Working Papers 135, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    5. Martin Wittenberg, 2017. "Wages and Wage Inequality in South Africa 1994–2011: Part 1 – Wage Measurement and Trends," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(2), pages 279-297, June.
    6. Wittenberg, Martin., 2014. "Analysis of employment, real wage, and productivity trends in South Africa since 1994," ILO Working Papers 994847703402676, International Labour Organization.

  8. Andrew Kerr, 2012. "A Model of Comparative Advantage with Matching in the Urban Tanzanian Labour Market," CSAE Working Paper Series 2012-21, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Lain, 2016. "Discrimination in a Search-Match Model with Self-Employment," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-02, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Jonathan Lain, 2019. "Discrimination in a search and matching model with self-employment," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 9(1), pages 1-35, December.

  9. Andrew Kerr & Francis Teal, 2012. "The Determinants of Earnings Inequalities: Panel data evidence from South Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2012-04, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg & Jairo Arrow, 2014. "Job Creation and Destruction in South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(1), pages 1-18, March.
    2. Hamoudi, Amar & Thomas, Duncan, 2014. "Endogenous coresidence and program incidence: South Africa's Old Age Pension," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 30-37.
    3. Amar Hamoudi & Duncan Thomas, 2014. "Endogenous Co-residence and Program Incidence: South Africa's Old Age Pension," NBER Working Papers 19929, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  10. Paolo Falco & Andrew Kerr & Neil Rankin & Justin Sandefur & Francis Teal, 2010. "The Returns to formality and Informality in Urban Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Aysit Tansel & Elif Oznur Kan, 2012. "The Formal/Informal Employment Earnings Gap: Evidence From Turkey," ERC Working Papers 1204, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Apr 2012.
    2. Huu Chi Nguyen & Christophe Nordman & François Roubaud, 2011. "Who Suffers the Penalty? A Panel Data Analysis of Earnings Gaps in Vietnam," Working Papers DT/2011/15, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    3. TANSEL, Aysit & Keskin, Halil Ibrahim & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin, 2015. "Is There an Informal Employment Wage Penalty in Egypt?," MPRA Paper 67051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Baptist, Simon & Teal, Francis J., 2015. "Why Do South Korean Firms Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Ghanaian Ones?," IZA Discussion Papers 9157, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Sarah Bridges & Louise Fox & Alessio Gaggero & Trudy Owens, 2013. "Labour Market Entry and Earnings: Evidence from Tanzanian Retrospective Data," Discussion Papers 13/05, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    6. Jonathan Lain, 2016. "Discrimination in a Search-Match Model with Self-Employment," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-02, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    7. Andrew Kerr, 2012. "A Model of Comparative Advantage with Matching in the Urban Tanzanian Labour Market," CSAE Working Paper Series 2012-21, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    8. Hirvonen, Kalle & Hoddinott, John F., 2018. "Payment modality preferences: Evidence from Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Programme," ESSP working papers 125, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Falco, Paolo & Maloney, William F. & Rijkers, Bob & Sarrias, Mauricio, 2015. "Heterogeneity in subjective wellbeing: An application to occupational allocation in Africa," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 137-153.
    10. Dieter von Fintel, 2016. "Institutional wage-setting, labour demand and labour supply: causal estimates from a South African pseudo-panel," Working Papers 07/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    11. Clarke, George, 2012. "Manufacturing firms in Africa: Some stylized facts about wages and productivity," MPRA Paper 36122, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Andy McKay & Jukka Pirttilä & Caroline Schimanski, 2019. "The tax elasticity of formal work in African countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-69, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Stefano A. Caria & Paolo Falco, 2018. "Does the Risk of Poverty Reduce Happiness?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67(1), pages 1-28.
    14. Andrew Kerr & Francis Teal, 2012. "The Determinants of Earnings Inequalities: Panel data evidence from South Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2012-04, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    15. Nordman, Christophe Jalil & Rakotomanana, Faly & Roubaud, François, 2016. "Informal versus Formal: A Panel Data Analysis of Earnings Gaps in Madagascar," IZA Discussion Papers 9970, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. Christian S. Otchia, 2019. "On Promoting Entrepreneurship and Job Creation in Africa: Evidence from Ghana and Kenya," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(2), pages 908-918.
    17. Fox, Louise & Sohnesen , Thomas Pave, 2012. "Household enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa : why they matter for growth, jobs, and livelihoods," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6184, The World Bank.
    18. Mengistu Assefa Wendimu & Peter Gibbon, 2014. "Labour markets for irrigated agriculture in central Ethiopia: Wage premiums and segmentation," IFRO Working Paper 2014/06, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    19. Hanan Nazier & Racha Ramadan, 2014. "Informality and Poverty: a Casuality Dilemma with Application to Egypt," Working Papers 895, Economic Research Forum, revised Dec 2014.
    20. Siba, Eyerusalem, 2015. "Returns to Physical Capital in Ethiopia: Comparative Analysis of Formal and Informal Firms," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 215-229.
    21. Philippe De Vreyer & François Roubaud, 2013. "Urban Labor Markets in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15808, December.
    22. Negrete Garcia, Ana Karen, 2018. "Constrained Potential: A Characterisation of Mexican Microenterprises," GIGA Working Papers 309, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    23. Falco, Paolo, 2014. "Does risk matter for occupational choices? Experimental evidence from an African labour market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 96-109.
    24. Kamei,Akito & Nakamura,Shohei, 2020. "Urban Agglomerations and Employment Transitions in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9184, The World Bank.
    25. Andrew Kerr, 2014. "Urban Labor Markets in Sub-Saharan Africa edited by Philippe De Vreyer and Franços Roubaud , Washington, DC : World Bank , 2013 , xxxii + 428 pp," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(4), pages 383-386, December.
    26. Bosch, Mariano & Goñi-Pacchioni, Edwin & Maloney, William, 2012. "Trade liberalization, labor reforms and formal–informal employment dynamics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 653-667.
    27. Jonathan Lain, 2019. "Discrimination in a search and matching model with self-employment," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 9(1), pages 1-35, December.

Articles

  1. Elwyn Davies & Andrew Kerr, 2018. "Firm Survival and Change in Ghana, 2003–2013," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 27(2), pages 149-171.

    Cited by:

    1. Florian Leon, 2019. "The elusive quest for high- growth firms in Africa: The (lack of) growth persistence in Senegal," Working Papers hal-02493326, HAL.

  2. Andrew Kerr, 2018. "Job Flows, Worker Flows and Churning in South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 86(S1), pages 141-166, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Andrew Kerr, 2017. "Tax(i)ing the Poor? Commuting Costs in South African Cities," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(3), pages 321-340, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Zizzamia, Rocco, 2020. "Is employment a panacea for poverty? A mixed-methods investigation of employment decisions in South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 130(C).

  4. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2015. "Sampling methodology and fieldwork changes in the October Household Surveys and Labour Force Surveys," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5), pages 603-612, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg & Jairo Arrow, 2014. "Job Creation and Destruction in South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(1), pages 1-18, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Falco, Paolo & Kerr, Andrew & Rankin, Neil & Sandefur, Justin & Teal, Francis, 2011. "The returns to formality and informality in urban Africa," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages 23-31.
    See citations under working paper version above.

Books

  1. Paolo Falco & Andrew Kerr & Pierella Paci & Bob Rijkers, 2014. "Working toward Better Pay : Earning Dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 18553, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Mlacha, Cornel J. & Ndanshau, Michael O.A, 2018. "Education and Labour Earnings Inequality in Tanzania: Evidence from Quantile Regression Analysis," MPRA Paper 89173, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. World Bank Group, 2016. "Kenya Country Economic Memorandum," World Bank Other Operational Studies 24008, The World Bank.
    3. World Bank Group, 2016. "Fifth Ethiopia Economic Update," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25747, The World Bank.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 10 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (6) 2010-08-06 2012-05-08 2012-05-22 2012-12-22 2013-09-13 2015-04-11. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (4) 2010-08-06 2012-05-22 2012-12-22 2020-07-20
  3. NEP-IUE: Informal & Underground Economics (4) 2012-05-08 2012-05-22 2012-12-22 2015-10-17
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2012-05-08 2012-05-22 2012-12-22
  5. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2020-07-20 2020-08-17
  6. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2012-05-08 2012-05-22
  7. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2015-04-11
  8. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2012-12-22
  9. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2016-09-04
  10. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2015-04-11
  11. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2015-10-17
  12. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (1) 2015-04-11
  13. NEP-TRE: Transport Economics (1) 2015-10-17
  14. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2015-10-17

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