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Sampling methodology and field work changes in the october household surveys and labour force surveys

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew Kerr

    () (DataFirst, University of Cape Town)

  • Martin Wittenberg

    () (DataFirst, University of Cape Town)

Abstract

The 1999 October Household Survey was the first time that Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) introduced a master sample of Enumeration Areas (Stats SA, 2000a). There were several important changes in sampling and field worker practice that accompanied the introduction of the master sample of EAs, which have not been systematically documented , and which make comparability of the surveys undertaken before and after this time difficult. We document these changes in this research note and provide evidence that these changes were partly responsible for the odd trends in the total number of single person households estimated from the October Household Surveys (OHSs) and Labour Force Surveys (LFSs), noted in Wittenberg and Collinson (2007) and Pirouz (2005), as well as rapid increases in employment, in the late 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Kerr & Martin Wittenberg, 2013. "Sampling methodology and field work changes in the october household surveys and labour force surveys," SALDRU Working Papers 101, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  • Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:101
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    1. repec:bla:sajeco:v:85:y:2017:i:2:p:298-318 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:39 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Martin Wittenberg, 2014. "Wages and wage inequality in South Africa 1994-2011: The evidence from household survey data," SALDRU Working Papers 135, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    4. repec:bla:sajeco:v:85:y:2017:i:2:p:279-297 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Wittenberg, Martin., 2014. "Analysis of employment, real wage, and productivity trends in South Africa since 1994," ILO Working Papers 994847703402676, International Labour Organization.
    6. repec:ilo:ilowps:484770 is not listed on IDEAS

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