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David Dillenberger

Personal Details

First Name:David
Middle Name:
Last Name:Dillenberger
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pdi167
http://www.econ.upenn.edu/~ddill/
423 McNeil 3718 Locust Walk Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297
215 898 1503

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.econ.upenn.edu/

: 215-898-7701
215-573-2057
160 McNeil Building, 3718 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297
RePEc:edi:deupaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. Dillenberger, David, 2008. "Preferences for One-Shot Resolution of Uncertainty and Allais-Type Behavior," MPRA Paper 8342, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Dillenberger, David & Sadowski, Philipp, 2008. "Ashamed to be Selfish," MPRA Paper 8343, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Dillenberger, David, 2008. "Preferences for One-Shot Resolution of Uncertainty and Allais-Type Behavior," MPRA Paper 8342, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Simone Cerreia-Vioglio & David Dillenberger & Pietro ortoleva, 2013. "Cautious Expected Utility and the Certainty Effect," Working Papers 488, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    2. David Dillenberger & Uzi Segal, 2013. "Skewed Noise," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-066, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    3. David Freeman, 2015. "Calibration without Reduction for Non-Expected Utility," Discussion Papers dp15-01, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
    4. Marianne Andries & Valentin Haddad, 2017. "Information Aversion," NBER Working Papers 23958, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. David Dillenberger & Uzi Segal, 2015. "Recursive Ambiguity And Machina'S Examples," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 55-61, February.
    6. Gil Riella, 2015. "On the representation of incomplete preferences under uncertainty with indecisiveness in tastes and beliefs," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 58(3), pages 571-600, April.
    7. Alaoui, Larbi, 2008. "The value of useless information," MPRA Paper 11411, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Wei Ma, 2015. "Optimal Information Transmission," Working Papers 201530, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    9. Dillenberger, David & Erol, Selman, 2013. "Negative certainty independence without betweenness," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(3), pages 596-598.
    10. Schmidt, Ulrich & Zank, Horst, 2013. "Chance theory: A separation of riskless and risky utility," Kiel Working Papers 1874, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    11. Larbi Alaoui, 2012. "The value of useless information," Working Papers 625, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    12. Armin Falk & Florian Zimmermann, 2016. "Beliefs and Utility: Experimental Evidence on Preferences for Information," CESifo Working Paper Series 6061, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Elabed, Ghada & Carter, Michael R., 2015. "Compound-risk aversion, ambiguity and the willingness to pay for microinsurance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 150-166.
    14. Dean, Mark & Ortoleva, Pietro, 2017. "Allais, Ellsberg, and preferences for hedging," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(1), January.
    15. Alice Hsiaw, 2015. "Goal Bracketing and Self-Control," Working Papers 90, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    16. Arna Olafsson & Michaela Pagel, 2017. "The Ostrich in Us: Selective Attention to Financial Accounts, Income, Spending, and Liquidity," NBER Working Papers 23945, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Botond Kőszegi, 2010. "Utility from anticipation and personal equilibrium," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 44(3), pages 415-444, September.
    18. Shiri Artstein-Avidan & David Dillenberger, 2010. "Dynamic Disappointment Aversion: Don't Tell Me Anything Until You Know For Sure," PIER Working Paper Archive 10-025, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    19. Valentin Haddad & Marianne Andries, 2014. "Information Aversion," 2014 Meeting Papers 1091, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    20. Jeffrey Ely & Alexander Frankel & Emir Kamenica, 2015. "Suspense and Surprise," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 123(1), pages 215-260.
    21. Özgür Evren, 2017. "Cautious and Globally Ambiguity Averse," Working Papers w0236, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).

  2. Dillenberger, David & Sadowski, Philipp, 2008. "Ashamed to be Selfish," MPRA Paper 8343, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Gorno, Leandro, 2016. "Additive representation for preferences over menus in finite choice settings," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 41-47.
    2. Özgür Evren & Stefania Minardi, 2017. "Warm‐glow Giving and Freedom to be Selfish," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(603), pages 1381-1409, August.
    3. Zak, F., 2014. "Psychological Games in the Theory of Choice. II. Shame, Regret, Egoism and Altruism," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 22(2), pages 12-40.
    4. Norio Takeoka, 2006. "Temptation, Certainty Effect, and Diminishing Self-Control," Levine's Bibliography 321307000000000507, UCLA Department of Economics.
    5. Daley, Brendan & Sadowski, Philipp, 2017. "Magical thinking: A representation result," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(2), May.
    6. Saito, Kota, 2015. "Impure altruism and impure selfishness," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PA), pages 336-370.
    7. Leandro Gorno, 2010. "Additive representation for preferences over menus in finite choice settings," Working Papers 1292, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..
    8. Vadim Cherepanov & Tim Feddersen & Alvaro Sandroni, 2013. "Revealed preferences and aspirations in warm glow theory," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 54(3), pages 501-535, November.
    9. Gustavo Adolfo Caballero Orozco, 2016. "Luck and Effort: Learning about Income from Friends and Neighbors," 2016 Papers pca706, Job Market Papers.

More information

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Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (2) 2008-04-29 2008-04-29
  2. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (2) 2008-04-29 2008-04-29
  3. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2008-04-29
  4. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2008-04-29

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