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Menu-Dependent Self-Control

Author

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  • Jawwad Noor

    () (Department of Economics, Boston University)

  • Norio Takeoka

    () (Department of Economics, Yokohama National University,)

Abstract

The literature on self-control problems has typically put forth models that imply behavior that is consistent with the Weak Axiom of Revealed Preference. We argue that when choice is the outcome of some underlying internal conflict, the resulting choices may not be perfectly consistent across choice problems: an agent’s ability to resist temptation may well depend on what alternatives are available to him. We generalize Gul and Pesendorfer [18] so that self-control weakens in the presence of temptation. The foundations of the models require weakening the Independence axiom. The model is shown to unify a range of well-known findings in the experimental literature on choice under risk and over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Jawwad Noor & Norio Takeoka, 2011. "Menu-Dependent Self-Control," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2011-041, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bos:wpaper:wp2011-041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John E. Stovall, 2010. "Multiple Temptations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(1), pages 349-376, January.
    2. Noor, Jawwad & Takeoka, Norio, 2010. "Uphill self-control," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 5(2), May.
    3. Larry Epstein & Igor Kopylov, 2006. "Cognitive Dissonance and Choice," RCER Working Papers 525, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    4. Jawwad Noor, 2005. "Temptation, Welfare and Revealed Preference," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2005-15, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    5. Eddie Dekel & Barton L. Lipman & Aldo Rustichini, 2009. "Temptation-Driven Preferences," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(3), pages 937-971.
    6. Kalyan Chatterjee & R. Vijay Krishna, 2005. "Menu Choice, Environmental Cues and Temptation: A “Dual Self” Approach to Self-control," Levine's Working Paper Archive 784828000000000576, David K. Levine.
    7. David K. Levine & Drew Fudenberg, 2006. "A Dual-Self Model of Impulse Control," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1449-1476, December.
    8. Nicholas Bardsley, 2008. "Dictator game giving: altruism or artefact?," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 11(2), pages 122-133, June.
    9. Kopylov Igor, 2009. "Temptations in General Settings," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-25, September.
    10. Faruk Gul & Wolfgang Pesendorfer, 2001. "Temptation and Self-Control," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(6), pages 1403-1435, November.
    11. Dubra, Juan & Maccheroni, Fabio & Ok, Efe A., 2004. "Expected utility theory without the completeness axiom," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 118-133, March.
    12. Yoram Halevy, 2008. "Strotz Meets Allais: Diminishing Impatience and the Certainty Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 1145-1162, June.
    13. Loewenstein, George & O'Donoghue, Ted, 2004. "Animal Spirits: Affective and Deliberative Processes in Economic Behavior," Working Papers 04-14, Cornell University, Center for Analytic Economics.
    14. Manel Baucells & Franz Heukamp, 2010. "Common ratio using delay," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 68(1), pages 149-158, February.
    15. Haluk Ergin & Todd Sarver, 2010. "A Unique Costly Contemplation Representation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(4), pages 1285-1339, July.
    16. Benhabib, Jess & Bisin, Alberto, 2005. "Modeling internal commitment mechanisms and self-control: A neuroeconomics approach to consumption-saving decisions," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 460-492, August.
    17. Amartya K. Sen, 1971. "Choice Functions and Revealed Preference," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(3), pages 307-317.
    18. Shiv, Baba & Fedorikhin, Alexander, 1999. " Heart and Mind in Conflict: The Interplay of Affect and Cognition in Consumer Decision Making," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(3), pages 278-292, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stovall, John E., 2018. "Temptation with uncertain normative preference," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 13(1), January.
    2. Noor, Jawwad & Takeoka, Norio, 2010. "Uphill self-control," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 5(2), May.
    3. Abe, Koji, 2012. "A geometric approach to temptation," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 92-97.
    4. Philipp Sadowski & David Dillenberger, 2011. "Ashamed to Be Selfish," Levine's Working Paper Archive 661465000000001193, David K. Levine.
    5. Larry Epstein & Igor Kopylov, 2006. "Cognitive Dissonance and Choice," RCER Working Papers 525, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    6. Norio Takeoka, 2006. "Temptation, Certainty Effect, and Diminishing Self-Control," Levine's Bibliography 321307000000000507, UCLA Department of Economics.
    7. Fernández-Val, Iván, 2009. "Fixed effects estimation of structural parameters and marginal effects in panel probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(1), pages 71-85, May.
    8. Doron Sonsino, 2010. "The irrelevant-menu affect on valuation," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 13(3), pages 309-333, September.
    9. André Lapied & Thomas Rongiconi, 2013. "Ambiguity as a Source of Temptation: Modeling Unstable Beliefs," AMSE Working Papers 1316, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
    10. Eddie Dekel & Barton L. Lipman & Aldo Rustichini, 2009. "Temptation-Driven Preferences," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(3), pages 937-971.
    11. Chatterjee, Kalyan & Krishna, R. Vijay, 2008. "A geometric approach to continuous expected utility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 89-94, January.
    12. Jawwad Noor, 2005. "Temptation, Welfare and Revealed Preference," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2005-15, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    13. Özgür Evren & Stefania Minardi, 2017. "Warm‐glow Giving and Freedom to be Selfish," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(603), pages 1381-1409, August.
    14. Joaquin Gomez-Minambres & Eric Schniter, 2012. "Menu-Dependent Emotions and Self-Control," Working Papers 12-20, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    15. Klaus Nehring, 2006. "Self-Control through Second-Order Preferences," Levine's Bibliography 321307000000000391, UCLA Department of Economics.
    16. Doriana Ruffino & Jonathan Treussard, 2006. "Derman and Taleb's 'The illusions of dynamic replication': a comment," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(5), pages 365-367.
    17. Wojciech Olszewski, 2011. "A model of consumption-dependent temptation," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 70(1), pages 83-93, January.
    18. Larry G. Epstein & Igor Kopylov, 2007. "An axiomatic model of 'cold feet'," RCER Working Papers 533, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).

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