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The Revealed Preference Theory of Changing Tastes

Author

Listed:
  • Wolfgang Pesendorfer

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

Plenary talk delivered at the annual meeting of the Society for Economic Dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Wolfgang Pesendorfer, 2002. "The Revealed Preference Theory of Changing Tastes," Annual Meeting Plenary 2002-3, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sedpln:2002-3
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    Cited by:

    1. Startz Richard & Tsang Kwok Ping, 2012. "Nonexponential Discounting: A Direct Test And Perhaps A New Puzzle," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-35, November.
    2. Bishnu, Monisankar & Wang, Min, 2013. "Voting under temptation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 419-423.
    3. Alexandrer Groves, 2013. "Identifying What is Tempting," 2013 Papers pgr489, Job Market Papers.
    4. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
    5. Tran, Chung, 2016. "Fiscal policy as a temptation control device: Savings subsidy and social security," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 254-268.
    6. João V. Ferreira & Nicolas Gravel, 2017. "Choice with Time," AMSE Working Papers 1729, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
    7. Joseph Y. Halpern & Samantha Leung, 2016. "Minimizing regret in dynamic decision problems," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 81(1), pages 123-151, June.
    8. Kevin X.D. Huang & Zheng Liu & John Qi Zhu, 2015. "Temptation and Self‐Control: Some Evidence and Applications," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(4), pages 581-615, June.
    9. Tran, Chung, 2018. "Temptation and taxation with elastic labor," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 351-369.
    10. Carlos Bethencourt & Lars Kunze, 2017. "Temptation and the efficient taxation of education and labor," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(4), pages 986-1000, November.
    11. Bodo Herzog, 2015. "Anchoring of expectations: The role of credible targets in a game experiment," Journal of Economic and Financial Studies (JEFS), LAR Center Press, vol. 3(6), pages 1-15, December.
    12. repec:eee:gamebe:v:107:y:2018:i:c:p:329-344 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Piermont, Evan & Takeoka, Norio & Teper, Roee, 2016. "Learning the Krepsian state: Exploration through consumption," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 69-94.
    14. repec:spr:jbecon:v:87:y:2017:i:8:d:10.1007_s11573-017-0847-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Sebastian Vollmer & Juditha Wójcik, 2017. "The long-term consequences of the global 1918 influenza pandemic: A systematic analysis of 117 IPUMS international census data sets," Working Papers 1721, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    16. Boyarchenko, Svetlana & Levendorskii, Sergei, 2010. "Discounting when income is stochastic and climate change policies," MPRA Paper 27998, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Felipe Zurita, 2009. "La Economía Financiera Frente a la Crisis," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 46(134), pages 183-195.
    18. Abe, Koji, 2012. "A geometric approach to temptation," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 92-97.
    19. Roee Teper, 2016. "Learning the Krepsian State: Exploration Through Consumption," Working Paper 5860, Department of Economics, University of Pittsburgh.
    20. Houser, Daniel & Schunk, Daniel & Winter, Joachim & Xiao, Erte, 2018. "Temptation and commitment in the laboratory," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 329-344.
    21. Lu, Shih En, 2016. "Models of limited self-control: Comparison and implications for bargaining," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 186-191.
    22. repec:eee:jetheo:v:173:y:2018:i:c:p:201-230 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Lu, Shih En, 2016. "Self-control and bargaining," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 390-413.
    24. Noor, Jawwad & Takeoka, Norio, 2015. "Menu-dependent self-control," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-20.

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