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Do Our Children Have a Chance? A Human Opportunity Report for Latin America and the Caribbean

Author

Listed:
  • José R. Molinas Vega
  • Ricardo Paes de Barros
  • Jaime Saavedra Chanduvi
  • Marcelo Giugale
  • Louise J. Cord
  • Carola Pessino
  • Amer Hasan

Abstract

This book reports on the status and evolution of human opportunity in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). It builds on the 2008 publication in several directions. First, it uses newly available data to expand the set of opportunities and personal circumstances under analysis. The data are representative of about 200 million children living in 19 countries over the last 15 years. Second, it compares human opportunity in LAC with that of developed countries, among them the United States and France, two very different models of social policy. This allows for illuminating exercises in benchmarking and extrapolation. Third, it looks at human opportunity within countries, across regions, states, and cities. This gives us a preliminary glimpse at the geographic dimension of equity, and at the role that different federal structures play. The overall message that emerges is one of cautious hope. LAC is making progress in opening the doors of development to all, but it still has a long way to go. At the current pace, it would take, on average, a generation for the region to achieve universal access to just the basic services that make for human opportunity. Seen from the viewpoint of equity, even our most successful nations lag far behind the developed world, and intracounty regional disparities are large and barely converging. Fortunately, there is much policy makers can do about it.

Suggested Citation

  • José R. Molinas Vega & Ricardo Paes de Barros & Jaime Saavedra Chanduvi & Marcelo Giugale & Louise J. Cord & Carola Pessino & Amer Hasan, 2012. "Do Our Children Have a Chance? A Human Opportunity Report for Latin America and the Caribbean," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2374.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:2374
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/2374/656560PUB0EPI2065717B09780821386996.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Francois Vaillancourt & Richard M.Bird, 2004. "Expenditure-Based Equalization Transfers," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0410, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    2. Ernesto Stein, 1999. "Fiscal Decentralization and Government Size in Latin America," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 2, pages 357-391, November.
    3. Eric A. Hanushek & Margaret E. Raymond, 2005. "Does school accountability lead to improved student performance?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(2), pages 297-327.
    4. World Bank, 2009. "World Development Indicators 2009," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4367.
    5. Faguet, Jean-Paul & Shami, Mahvish, 2008. "Fiscal policy and spatial inequality in Latin America and beyond," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 27162, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Eric A. Hanushek, 2003. "The Failure of Input-Based Schooling Policies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 64-98, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    1. repec:kap:jfamec:v:38:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10834-016-9502-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:hpe:journl:y:2016:v:219:i:4:p:93-120 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Joseph Deutsch & Jacques Silber, 2011. "An ordinal approach to the study of intergenerational opportunities for standard of living: the case of Latin America," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, pages 579-604.

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