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Heterogeneity in preferences for smoking cessation

Author

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  • Robert W. Paterson

    (Industrial Economics, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA)

  • Kevin J. Boyle

    (Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA, USA)

  • Christopher F. Parmeter

    (Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA, USA)

  • James E. Neumann

    (Industrial Economics, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA)

  • Paul De Civita

    (Government of Canada's Policy Research Initiative, Ottawa, Canada)

Abstract

Promoting cessation is a cornerstone of tobacco control efforts by public-health agencies. Economic information to support cessation programs has generally emphasized cost-effectiveness or the impact of cigarette pricing and smoking restrictions on quit rates. In contrast, this study provides empirical estimates of smoker preferences for increased efficacy and other attributes of smoking cessation therapies (SCTs). Choice data were collected through a national survey of Canadian smokers. We find systematic preference heterogeneity for therapy types and SCT attributes between light and heavy smokers, as well as random heterogeneity using random parameters logit models. Preference heterogeneity is greatest between length of use and types of SCTs. We estimate that light smokers would be willing to pay nearly $500 ($CAN) to increase success rates to 40% with the comparable figure for heavy smokers being near $300 ($CAN). Results from this study can be used to inform research and development for smoking cessation products and programs and suggest important areas of future inquiry regarding heterogeneity of smoker preferences and preferences for other health programs. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert W. Paterson & Kevin J. Boyle & Christopher F. Parmeter & James E. Neumann & Paul De Civita, 2008. "Heterogeneity in preferences for smoking cessation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(12), pages 1363-1377.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:17:y:2008:i:12:p:1363-1377
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1336
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David A. Katz & Kenda R. Stewart & Monica Paez & Mark W. Weg & Kathleen M. Grant & Christine Hamlin & Gary Gaeth, 2018. "Development of a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) Questionnaire to Understand Veterans’ Preferences for Tobacco Treatment in Primary Care," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;International Academy of Health Preference Research, vol. 11(6), pages 649-663, December.
    2. Ida, Takanori & Goto, Rei & Takahashi, Yuko & Nishimura, Shuzo, 2011. "Can economic-psychological parameters predict successful smoking cessation?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 285-295, May.
    3. Michael R. Richards & Joachim Marti & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Jason Fletcher & Donald Kenkel, 2017. "Tobacco Control, Medicaid Coverage, and the Demand for Smoking Cessation Drugs," American Journal of Health Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 528-549, Fall.
    4. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Michael F. Pesko & Steven C. Hill, 2017. "The Effect of Insurance Expansions on Smoking Cessation Medication Prescriptions: Evidence from ACA Medicaid Expansions," NBER Working Papers 23450, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Joachim Marti & John Buckell & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Jody L. Sindelar, 2016. "To ‘Vape’ or Smoke? A Discrete Choice Experiment Among U.S. Adult Smokers," NBER Working Papers 22079, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Arne Hole & Julie Kolstad, 2012. "Mixed logit estimation of willingness to pay distributions: a comparison of models in preference and WTP space using data from a health-related choice experiment," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 445-469, April.

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