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A dynamic analysis of GP visiting in Ireland: 1995–2001

  • Anne Nolan
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    This paper examines the determinants of GP visiting in Ireland, using panel data from the Living in Ireland Survey from 1995–2001. While cross‐sectional studies provide important information on GP visiting patterns at a certain point in time, with panel data we can also control for unobserved individual heterogeneity, as well as identify whether it is the same individuals who consistently visit their GP year on year, or whether there is more mobility in visiting. We therefore estimate dynamic models of GP utilisation, and attempt to decompose the observed variation in GP visiting into components attributable to observed individual characteristics, unobserved individual heterogeneity and state dependence. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/
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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 16 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 2 (02)
    Pages: 129-143

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:2:p:129-143
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    1. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & José M. Labeaga & Maite Martínez-Granado, 2002. "Latent class versus two-part models in the demand for physician services across the European Union," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(4), pages 301-321.
    2. Nolan, Brian, 1993. "Economic incentives, health status and health services utilisation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 151-169, July.
    3. Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 1996. "Equity in Health Care Utilisation: Further Tests Based on Hurdle models and Swedish Micro Data," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 116, Stockholm School of Economics.
    4. Teresa Bago d'Uva, 2006. "Latent class models for utilisation of health care," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 329-343.
    5. Martin Schellhorn, 2001. "The effect of variable health insurance deductibles on the demand for physician visits," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(5), pages 441-456.
    6. Verbeek, Marno & Nijman, Theo, 1992. "Testing for Selectivity Bias in Panel Data Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 33(3), pages 681-703, August.
    7. David (David Patrick) Madden, 2005. "Doctors’ fees in Ireland following the change in reimbursement : did they jump?," Working Papers 200520, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    8. Katharina Hauck & Nigel Rice, 2004. "A longitudinal analysis of mental health mobility in Britain," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 981-1001.
    9. A. C. Cameron & P. K. Trivedi & Frank Milne & J. Piggott, 1988. "A Microeconometric Model of the Demand for Health Care and Health Insurance in Australia," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(1), pages 85-106.
    10. Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Ulrich, 1995. "An Econometric Model of the Two-Part Decisionmaking Process in the Demand for Health Care," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(2), pages 339-361.
    11. Nijman, T.E. & Verbeek, M.J.C.M., 1992. "Testing for selectivity in panel data models," Other publications TiSEM 7ec34a6c-1d84-4052-971c-d, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    12. Hurd, Michael D. & McGarry, Kathleen, 1997. "Medical insurance and the use of health care services by the elderly," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 129-154, April.
    13. VAN OURTI, Tom, 2002. "Measuring horizontal inequity in health care using Belgian panel data," Working Papers 2002034, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    14. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2004. "The dynamics of health in the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 473-503.
    15. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
    16. Tussing, A. Dale, 1985. "Irish Medical Care Resources: An Economic Analysis," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number GRS126.
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